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Archives > 2008 > Jan
Thursday, January 31, 2008
MSI P35 Platinum Combo Motherboard @ Viper Lair
"Overclocking the old fashioned way was actually very easy, despite the E6750's 333MHz FSB. With little effort, we were able to reach 490Mhz on air. Granted, we've had to increase the voltages to the max for CPU and chipset, but this was impressive considering we were using air cooling. I was able to squeeze an extra 4MHz out of the Gigabyte board, but given in the past I've had some issues with overclocking MSI boards, I was quite pleased with the results."

More information can be found here.
Danger Den MPC-975X Chipset Waterblock @ techPowerUp
"With the redesigned MC-TDX CPU waterblock, Danger Den has also released some new chipset blocks based on the same pin design. The new MPC series chipset blocks feature 225 heat-dissipating columns in the typical copper base. We take a look at the MPC-975X chipset block, which is designed to work with the Intel 975X chipset."

More information can be found here.
Yamaha YSP-4000 Digital Sound Projector Review @ Digital Trends
"Add surround sound to your flat panel TV with the wonderfuly powerful Yamaha YSP-4000 Digital Sound Projector."

More information can be found here.
NZXT Cryo LX Notebook Cooler Review @ Bigbruin.com
"This Cryo LX definitely takes inspiration from some of NZXT's cases, and incorporates quality materials and a well thought out design into a cooler capable of handling 17" (and even 19") notebook computers. Constructed mostly of thick Aluminum, and sporting three 120mm fans, this isn't just an oversized version of the typical notebook cooler."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Mod of the Month - January 2008
"Remember when you were a little kid, and playing house was fun? Everyone here who is living on his or her own is probably now saying"

More information can be found here.
LaCie Hard Disk Design by Neil Poulton 500GB Review @ Digital Trends
"Designed by Neil Poulton, the Lacie Hard Disk provides ample storage, and a sleek high-end look."

More information can be found here.
Wednesday, January 30, 2008
Virtualization Made Easy In Ubuntu 8.04
"One of the features that was introduced a year ago into Ubuntu 7.04"

More information can be found here.
Uniblue SpyEraser Spyware Removal Software Review @ Tweaknews.net
"This program has probably the most intuitive and attractive interface of all the anti-spyware programs out there. For less advanced users it is simple to use, offers real-time protection, and works well at removing known threats. Customization options and explanations about spyware types and infected areas should satisfy the more savvy users as well, furthering its appeal."

More information can be found here.
Akasa revo Bubble Pump cooler Review @ XtremeComputing
"OK, so what I can understand is that the Revo works by having a mix of coolant in the ‘cooling-loop’. Part of the coolant is liquid and part of it is a liquid that expands to a gas under the heat of the CPU (and cools back to a liquid when it passes through the radiator). There is a mini reservoir in the base of the cooler, and as the coolant gets hot it moves up the big pipe, and the resulting convection system moves it all around the cooler. The coolant that changes to gas creates bubbles in this loop and these help move the liquid round (somehow)."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Pirates of the Burning Sea
"Pirates of the Burning Sea is an odd kettle of fish. It's pretty ugly and mediocre to look at for the most part, but it does have a certain rugged appeal to the presentation. The control system and style of combat is difficult to get to grips with and poorly explained, but rewarding nonetheless and worth a look. The quests too are flawed, proving dull for the most part but thrillingly epic if you want to get into the spirit of it all. So, with how many contradictions, how are we supposed to judge a game as massive and open as that of //The Burning Sea. Reviewing an MMO is a challenge at the best of times and we've barely scratched the surface of what's on offer on these high seas. The final and ultimate test of any virtual world is the how populated it is and that's something that is hard to judge too, confined as we are to the early days of this particular game. However, it has to be said that even to us the game looked like it had a good number of players onboard. Better, since everybody always wants an excuse to dress like a pirate, there were hardly any bright pink trolls running around calling each other n00bs. If that's not a sign of quality, I don't know what is. //Pirates of the Burning Sea may be a little damaged by some flaws and contradictions in the game design, but the truth of the matter is that there's a little piece of eight buried somewhere inside and if you take the time to uncover it then you may well find yourself an MMO worthy of your attention for at least a few months."

More information can be found here.
PC-Doctor, Inc. Always on call @ Bjorn3D
"So you overclocked your PC a bit too far and now you can't boot your system. Did you short out your motherboard? Maybe it's just your power supply? Did static electricity zap your shiny new $500 GPU while you were tinkering inside the tower looking for the culprit to your PC woes? Who's to say? How would you find out with an un-bootable system? Did your BIOS get corrupted, or is it a hardware problem? Geek squad to the rescue you say? Not this time, have that black and white VW bug towed! If you are the lucky owner of PC Doctor Service Center 6 you are on your way to performing successful surgery and diagnostics on your ailing PC's innards and sending it to the recovery room for some Jello in no time. Service Center 6 will diagnose Windows compatible systems all the way back to Windows 2000, allowing you to test just about any compatible device on the market that you can cram into your pc and somehow manage to short out, but is it worth your hard earned cash? Let's find out !"

More information can be found here.
Tuesday, January 29, 2008
Cowon Q5W MP4 Player Review @ Digital Trends
"Cowon proves that making a media player more like a handheld computer isn't such a hot idea."

More information can be found here.
R500 XAA/EXA RadeonHD Performance
"The public release of AMD's"

More information can be found here.
A-DATA Nobility N702 4GB USB Flash Drive @ techPowerUp
"A-DATA is known for their unique USB flash devices. The new Nobility N702 is no different. It looks so fancy, that it can be used as a necklace or key chain with its shiny metal casing and tugged away USB connector."

More information can be found here.
Zalman ZM-NB47J Passive Northbridge Heatsink
"One of the problems with old motherboard chipset heatsinks, apart from their small size, is the little fans almost always seize up. Constant use, time, and dust bunnies conspire to stop impeller blades from spinning. If the fan stops on a postage size heatsink, there's a good chance the chipset will overheat too. For this problem Zalman have introduced a small passive aluminum chipset heatsink called the ZM-NB47J."

More information can be found here.
Logisys UltraSlim Keyboard @ techPowerUp
"The Logisys Ultra Slim Soft Touch Multimedia Keyboard has much more to offer than just your average keyboard. It has a two-tone matte/glossy black finish to compliment the very slim and compact design. The keystroke is soft and very quiet, while the palm rest ensures maximum comfort. Combine this with a range of internet and multimedia hot keys, and you have a recipe for a great product with a great price."

More information can be found here.
I4U: Burnout Paradise for Sony PS3 Review
"This is one of the best racing games I have played on the PS3 or any other system in a long time. One of the coolest things about this game is that you never have to endure a load screen. That’s right no load screens ever, not even to get online or start a race. When you get tired of driving around the city crashing into traffic and hunting big jumps all you need to do to get a race is pull up to any stop light and spin your tires by holding brake and gas at once."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: AMD ATI Radeon HD 3870 X2
"While the Radeon HD 3870 X2 has the potential to become one of, if not the fastest graphics cards released to date, it's not something that I can recommend over Nvidia's current flagship GeForce 8800 Ultra and 8800 GTX cards because it's only as strong as its weakest link. Sadly for AMD's graphics product group, that means there's a long road ahead with driver support for this beast because, even from just looking at current releases, I believe there will be scenarios in the future where CrossFire isn't as well supported as it probably should be. There are many ways to look at this and I'm sure the conspiracy theorists are hard at work. Are the developers locking AMD out because they're working closely with Intel's and Nvidia's developer relations teams? Is AMD's developer relations team helping developers to implement proper CrossFire support? Or is there something else that I've missed completely? I honestly don't know what the situation is, but there are developers which I've spoken to in confidence that //haven't heard from AMD for a while. Ultimately, the long term success of this card is going to come down to AMD's driver and developer relations teams and how well it gets supported in this year's crop of new releases. I'm all for faster graphics cards using multiple GPUs, but there needs to be transparency for the gamer to really harness a multi-GPU card's potential. In the scenarios where the support is there, the Radeon HD 3870 X2 performs very well and it can be looked upon as a match for Nvidia's now nine-month old GeForce 8800 Ultra, but in the scenarios where there isn't support, you end up with a card that isn't even as fast as something that's nearly half the price."

More information can be found here.
Thermalright Ultima-90 Heatpipe CPU Cooler Review @ Bigbruin.com
"Thermalright always puts out top quality products that offer computer enthusiasts a significant upgrade over stock cooling hardware. The Ultima-90 Heatpipe CPU Cooler is without a doubt an excellent choice for your hot processor due to its cooling capabilities, relatively simple installation, compact design, and support for most modern CPUs."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Ghost Squad
"The gameplay is simple -- each player, of which there can be up to four (though the ideal number is two), grabs a controller and goes for it. Your trigger finger shoots, the A button performs scripted actions such as defusing bombs and shaking the controller reloads your gun. You can also use the D-Pad to change your firing mode but, to be honest, once you've found which mode you prefer then you'll probably not have to change it. Personally, I found the default three-round burst was the most efficient, especially on the lower levels. There are only three levels in / /Ghost Squad -- a tropical villa, Air Force One and a jungle encampment. In each level some baddies have taken some hostages and it's up to you as members of the Ghost Squad to try and rescue them. The game tries to layer some plot and exposition over the top of this basic premise through cutscenes and narration from the squad commander, but it's all pretty superfluous. There are bad guys. You have a gun. That is all you need to know."

More information can be found here.
Monday, January 28, 2008
HP iPAQ 310 Travel Companion Review @ Digital Trends
"The HP iPAQ 310 tries to be fifteen different things in one, including a GPS receiver, PDA, MP3 player, video player, handheld gaming device, and more. Sadly, it's a jack-of-all-trades device that is not very good at any of these things. We'd cut it some slack if just the GPS worked as expected, but sadly even that functionality is plagued with issues. The overall main issue with this product is that regardless of what feature you are trying to use, it is not user friendly, and in most cases reading the manual won't help since it's remarkably incomplete and lacking information on a wide array of topics."

More information can be found here.
KillerNIC: a statistical analysis @ NordicHardware
"There is perhaps no other product that is more controversial and generates more heated debates around the 'Net than the Killer NIC. It makes big claims, and the difficulty is that traditional testing methods may not give a full representation of the card's abilities. As a result, I've spent weeks testing and exploring the Killer's resulting impact on lag, framerates, and responsiveness, running it through the paces, gathering massive amounts of data."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: MSI no longer supports 125W CPUs on the K9A2 CF
"We checked around and at the same time were sent more questions about the use of these hot processors - we found while the board was able to use them and was perfectly stable in our stress test, there were some reports that this board had failed when using the same processors. One customer on Newegg complained that his K9A2 CF had actually set itself alight after being left to run Folding@Home. Take a"

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Watercooling 201: The Waterblock
"So, before we get into that, let's take a look at what a waterblock actually does and how it works. I suppose the first part is easy – a waterblock sucks heat from the CPU, right? Well, sort of... not really. But yes... no. Why the confusion? Well, this is a //huge misconception. Let's rephrase this properly: A waterblock obtains temperature equilibrium with the heat spreader of the underlying chip. That's it. No sucking involved. It's the same misconception as air cooling – a heatsink doesn't actually cool the chip. It simply provides a greater surface area for the heat to spread over. Since there's more metal to heat up, there's less heat in each molecule of metal – so it //seems like it's cooling. The real definition of cooling is the //removal of heat from the system – no heat is being removed here, just simply spread out. Instead, it's the fluid—be it air or water—that actually does the cooling. This probably seems pedantic – the block cools, or the block spreads the heat and thus lowers temperature. It may seem the same, but it's not – it radically changes how we need to look at water blocks. We can distil everything above down to one basic statement: A block's function is not to cool your CPU – it's to provide the most contact with water molecules as possible."

More information can be found here.
Daze Products Nintendo DS Game Chamber Review @ Bigbruin.com
"It is frustrating to spend $30 to $50 on a Nintendo DS game only to have it lost or damaged. A simple container to hold games securely and only allow one game out at a time is a great option! For a relatively small price you can potentially save yourself a good deal of money and avoid plenty of headaches with the Daze Products Nintendo DS Game Chamber."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Staying Independent
"There are a lot of crushed souls in the games industry. A lot of people who set out with the hope of creating fantastic new games that allow them to express their creativity, whilst simultaneously providing a great experience for the players. These are the people who were cut deepest when publisher’s pull the budget on the “risky” titles in favour of the “safe bets”. These are the people who lost a little more hope each time the producer told them that their idea was way too ‘out there’ for a modern audience. We knew people like this when we set up Introversion and we run into them now and then in the bars and restaurants surrounding the games conferences. When we first set out to write video games we knew the damage that publishers could do both to games themselves, and the people writing them, and we were not willing to let that happen to us. In order to ensure our creative freedom, we had to be independent from publishers and license holders, and that independence has become a guiding mantra for us. Independence from publishers has allowed us ultimate freedom and enabled us to create without compromise, explore without boundaries and live by a work ethos that isn’t about setting limitations. After six years with the sole aim of keeping the company financially afloat, we did a spot of team building or as industry bods call it, ‘vision alignment’. We wanted to establish in what direction we might all be heading. Despite the fact that we’re a fairly disparate bunch of people with very different motivations, the exercise really proved that remaining independent was the key shared aspiration at Introversion."

More information can be found here.
2008: The Future of Photo Printers @ CoolTechZone.com
"2008 is a depressingly unexciting year for photo printers and printers in general, for that matter. Obviously everyone from HP to Kodak to Canon is working feverishly in their R&D labs to reveal a disrupting technology. They just never have anything to show for their time, effort and capital, other than a lot of false promises and disappointing results. The same is true for 2008 and maybe even the next few years."

More information can be found here.
How Linux Users Should React in a Windows World @ OSWeekly.com
"Many Linux users find themselves working in Windows-based environments. More often that not, this is not something that can be avoided, and to be honest, I cannot actually say for certain that it should be. Despite the resistance from some Linux users to remain familiar with other operating systems, there is a certain level of importance in making sure that Windows does remain something that you are familiar with. And I say this for a number of reasons. Today, I will examine the advantages on all fronts as to being fluent with more than one OS."

More information can be found here.
32-Inch Digital Photo Display A Reality @ CoolTechZone.com
"The silly things some companies will say to get media attention never cease to amaze us. At CES 2008, we had a long talk with Kodak about its line of digital photo displays, and one of the"

More information can be found here.
Wireless Industry Confused By Google Android @ CoolTechZone.com
"Ever since Google announced its decision to take on the wireless industry, we've personally commented on how wireless carriers are threatened by Google and what it entails for them going forward. Of course, AT&T and Verizon's decision to announce their openness at an inopportune time didn't help matters either. However, things might be different in the wireless land, we hear."

More information can be found here.
Will You Give Up On Vista? @ OSWeekly.com
"We’ve talked about Apple’s forays into television advertising with their Get a Mac campaign, and we’re used to seeing these ads appear on television by now. We’re also familiar with the clever but simplistic (sometimes excessively so) print ads that Apple has pushed out to the masses in order to get us thinking about their products. Both of these methods of spreading the word can be very effective, but one specific avenue of advertising that we don’t usually talk about when it comes to Apple is online advertising. That may have been true in the past, but Apple’s recent efforts in this area have us talking now."

More information can be found here.
Microsoft Must Reinvent Itself, Learn from Apple @ OSWeekly.com
"Believe it or not, Microsoft's biggest flaw has little to do with the countless security issues with previous releases of their operating system. No, it's actually a problem with the way the company collectively decides what the user wants. Instead, it seems like Microsoft's idea of what is truly groundbreaking has become what's good enough, at least on the consumer side of the fence."

More information can be found here.
The Downside With OS Updates @ OSWeekly.com
"In most cases, operating system updates are a good thing because they fix problems and sometimes provide new functionality for you to use and enjoy. There’s no problem with this, but when these updates cause more problems than they solve, then you know something’s wrong."

More information can be found here.
Ultra X2 750W Extreme Titanium @ Bjorn3D
"During my time here at Bjorn3D it seems like many of the reviews we have done have been power supplies. As mentioned in another review 2007 was 'The Year of the Power Supply'. Either way, as long as manufacturers keep producing this level of quality, keep them coming. The Ultra 750W X2 Extreme delivers power, low noise and a mirror. That's right, I said a mirror. Ok, so it is a 'titanium' case that, when you look at it, you can see yourself, a mirror. It is also completely modular down to the 24 pin power connector for the motherboard. Will this power supply have the power and efficiency a computer so requires? Let's find out."

More information can be found here.
HIS Radeon HD 3870 X2 1 GB @ techPowerUp
"The HIS Radeon 3870 X2 combines the power of two ATI RV670 GPUs into one to reach for the performance throne in single card processing power. Even tough the implementation has some minor limitations the overall product is certainly interesting and can maybe bring AMD back in the game."

More information can be found here.
Sunday, January 27, 2008
MSI NX8600GT Twin Turbo Video Card @ Viper Lair
"Obviously, anything you can put into that PCIe slot to update the on-board video is going to give you a boost, the MSI NX8600GT Twin Turbo is not only going to do that, its going to do it while keeping those all important big bills in your savings account. nVidia has been king of the high end market space for some time now, and the midrange has been going their way as well. When they have cards such as the NX8600GT Twin Turbo being put out by Manufacturers such as MSI in this case, its no wonder."

More information can be found here.
Intel Penryn architecture dissected @ NordicHardware
"Thanks to the new 45nm process, the power leakage has been severely reduced, and we now have a much cooler and more efficient processor. But what does a refining of the process really mean? How much performance does the increased cache really bring? "

More information can be found here.
Razer Destructor Mouse Mat @ techPowerUp
"Razer Destructor is the name of the newest hard gaming surface that uses a new surface technology. The Destructor features the all new "Fractal" surface that should enable you to get the best tracking out of your laser or optical mouse."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Apevia X-Telstar Junior case
"//Our first reaction to the display was one of quiet surprise and happiness. It’s bright and full-coloured, proving readable from various viewing angles so that you didn’t have to look at it head-on. We turned the knob of the fan controller and the display reacted straight away. There are three dials on the display and though all of them are pretty small, they are still perfectly legible at a glance. The dial in the bottom left monitors how noisy the case is, the bottom right is for fan speed, the top displays system voltage and a figure in the middle lets you know the internal temperature according to the Apevia probe. It’s actually quite good, until you look closely anyway."

More information can be found here.
Saturday, January 26, 2008
bit-tech News: Burnout Paradise
"Burnout Paradise is, by far, the most open and interesting //Burnout game we've ever played. Playing past //Burnout games has been a very linear experience and getting stuck at a certain point, unable to get the 400 takedowns needed to progress within the space of two minutes, could be a major bummer. / /Paradise gets rid of that annoyance with an extremely elegant solution, re-designing the entire game so effortlessly and naturally that you might struggle to believe that there was ever a //Burnout game that wasn't like this. Does it have flaws? Yes, clearly. The most major one is obvious when you fail a race and have to hike back across the entire map in order to restart -- a simple quick-travel or retry function would have been a welcome addition. The same is true when players want to change their car and have to spend a while hunting down one of the five junkyards on the map. Still, ignore that and the lack of offline multiplayer and / /Burnout Paradise is clearly a new highpoint for the series. Sure, it's annoying not to be able to fight your friends up-close, but for a game this good it's something we can learn to live without and, honestly, we're far too addicted to the Showtime gamemode to say anything really bad about this otherwise excellent game."

More information can be found here.
Friday, January 25, 2008
Zalman ZM-NBF47 Northbridge Chipset Heatsink Review
"One of the problems with old motherboard chipset heatsinks, apart from their small size, is the little fans almost always seize up. Constant use, time, and dust bunnies conspire to stop impeller blades from spinning. If the fan stops on a postage size heatsink, there's a good chance the chipset will overheat - there's just not enough surface area to adequately release the heat from the chipset into the surrounding air. For this problem Zalman have introduced the ZM-NBF47 fan-style chipset heatsink."

More information can be found here.
Zalman ZM-NBF47 Northbridge Chipset Heatsink Review
"Xigmatek's MAC-S3501 memory heatspreaders are intended for DDR and DDR2 memory modules, and assuming the sticks of memory you have are bare, installation is a quick affair. A thin strip of jelly silicon thermal interface is laid down on the DRAM, and then the anodized aluminum Xigmatek MAC-S3501 heatspreaders are set in place. If on the other hand your memory already has heatspreaders that are attached with adhesive or frag tape, there's a good chance you may destroy your memory if you attempt to remove the heatspreaders. "

More information can be found here.
Sapphire HD3870 Atomic Edition @ techPowerUp
"Sapphire's new HD 3870 Atomic Edition is a special version of the Radeon HD 3870 with a single slot cooler. This is only possible because Sapphire uses a new cooling technology called Vapor-X cooling that improves cooling performance considerably while keeping noise down. Another plus of this card is that it comes overclocked out of the box with full warranty."

More information can be found here.
New Approach To ATI Linux Driver Installation
"Back in June of 2005 with the ATI Linux 8.14.13 driver release was a new installer to more easily facilitate the installation of this binary graphics driver using a graphical interface for a generic setup or generating distribution-specific packages (at that time Red Hat was the only officially supported distribution). With time, this installer has evolved by gaining new features and more distributions are being supported through their --buildpkg command for generating custom driver packages. These packaging scripts are now even hosted in the open for more community interaction. With two new driver options that will be formally introduced next month in Ubuntu's packaging scripts for the Catalyst 8.02 Linux driver, the installation process of the ATI fglrx driver on Ubuntu will become several steps easier."

More information can be found here.
iSkin Revo & Revo Clip for Apple iPhone @ Legit Reviews
"The iSkin Revo is available in 6 different colors to match your mood and your outfit. iSkin gives the colors some very hip names like: Rah, Zahra, Nighthawk, Mojave, and Diablo. The “Bluish” colored Revo that we field tested was called Blade. Blade...Nice! Priced at $40, iSkin includes the silicon protector, a privacy film that is compatible with either the iPhone or iPod Touch, and a ViSOR – an ultra-clear polycarbonate scratch resistant screen guard. The Revo’s silicon protector even has an anti-microbial agent (Microban) that protects the iPhone and its user from bacteria that can congregate. I can certainly appreciate this as it is really disgusting to use a phone after someone has been sweating and breathing heavy on your device. Yuck..."

More information can be found here.
Aeneon Xtune DDR3-1333 @ Bjorn3D
"Today we are looking at the newest offering in DDR3 from the company AENEON. Now if you're like me, chances are you prefer to stick with a well established company that has a long history of quality and commitment to their customers. Well you're in luck because AENEON is just that company. Before you call the guys in white coats to come a drag me away to the padded room let me explain. AENEON is a new brand of memory being offered by Qimonda. You can find Qimonda memory chips just about everywhere, even in some of the hottest video cards like the 8800GT. Today we are going to look at their enthusiast line of memory kits dubbed 'Xtune'. Like it or not DDR3 is here to stay so you might as well find what kits excel and which ones crash and burn. With speeds guaranteed up to 1500 MHz at 1.5 volts and a warranty backed by Qimonda, this memory looks to establish itself as the RAM to beat. Let's cut to the chase and get down to the nitty gritty."

More information can be found here.
Thermaltake SwordM VD5000BNA Super Tower Chassis Review @ Bigbruin.com
"Thermaltake has really taken case design to the extreme with the SwordM VD5000BNA Super Tower Chassis. The quality of the components is top notch, the styling is definitely unique, the features are generally well thought out, and some of the innovative design elements might actually be revolutionary."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Asus Striker II Formula
"Despite the fact it offers absolutely no extra performance and a few iffy bits, we really like this board and it offers good value for the genuine features it delivers. If you really want the latest SLI solution, the Striker II Formula should certainly be on your shopping list -- just be wary of what's coming out in the next few months: you won't be waiting another year for a chipset update like before. That said, with Nehalem CPUs just over a year away, the Asus Striker II Formula might also be the perfect complement to get an annual upgrade cycle under way."

More information can be found here.
GeForce 8800 Graphics Performance: GT vs GTS vs GTX @ BmR
"Despite numerous reviews of every GeForce 8800 graphics card since NVIDIA first launched the series, many consumers are still left without any real information to compare their choices when shopping for their gaming system. Graphics performance is the most importance function of a video card, and Benchmark Reviews offers this comparison of the three most popular GeForce 8800 video card models on the market. Our tests will include benchmarks on the: ZOTAC 8800 GT vs. the FOXCONN 8800 GTS vs. the MSI 8800 GTX."

More information can be found here.
I4U: Logitech Cordless Desktop MX 5500 Revolution Review
"Today we are taking a look at the new Logitech Cordless Desktop MX5500 Revolution. This is the first cordless desktop from Logitech to include the Revolution mouse in a cordless design. The mouse is where the Logitech Cordless Desktop MX 5500 Revolution shines with a MX Revolution Cordless Laser Mouse. The mouse features the hyperfast scroll wheel that the Revolution line of mice is famous for. The Bluetooth mini receiver can be used as a Bluetooth hub as well."

More information can be found here.
Thursday, January 24, 2008
Gateway FX7020 Review @ Digital Trends
"The Gateway FX7020 is the company's budget gaming system that has a lot to offer for the price."

More information can be found here.
Logitech ChillStream Actively Cooled Gamepad Review @ Tweaknews.net
"To say the least, this controller is a mixed bag of pros and cons with neither of them propping the product to be a winner or pushing it down to being an absolute failure. Sure this is a good ergonomic controller which should perform its gaming tasks with ease, but the main defining characteristic, the cooling, needs work."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Wolfking Warrior XXtreme review
"It's discouraging to say the least, but the reality is that the XXtreme version just isn't as good as the original Warrior. Worse, the effort that has been put in to improve the design has only worsened the product, removing the portability and creating a second, useless half to the product. I suppose, if you were //very much into MMORPGs, which typically have more complex interfaces, then the XXtreme may be a little more appealing -- but you'd have to overlook the fact that there are other keyboards out there targeted at the most popular MMOs specifically. That said, the XXtreme isn't a bad keyboard -- half of it is still really good. The only insurmountable problem is that the only half you'd really want to use is available on its own. The XXtreme version doesn't add anything essential over the original and that's where it falls down."

More information can be found here.
Creative ZEN - 4GB Review @ XtremeComputing
"Having recently reviewed the creative Zen Stone Plus a few months back, which I highly recommended, I couldn’t wait to get my hands on Creative’s new flash-based ZEN. This highly featured digital media player allows the user to play MP3, WMA, Audible and WAVE file types, plus WMV support Movies and Photos on the move, bringing you a whole world of entertainment at the touch of a button. The model we have today is the 4GB version, but the ZEN is available in three other sizes to choose from, and that’s not all the ZEN is hiding under its belt..."

More information can be found here.
Kingwin Mach 1 ABT-800MA1S 800W Modular PSU @ Benchmark Reviews
"Kingwin has recently decided to join the ranks of other companies which have branched their product line into the power supply unit industry. More know for their very effective HDT Heatpipe Direct Touch coolers, Kingwin is also insistent that their PSU line be just as beneficial to the hardware enthusiast. Overclockers and gamers will most likely enjoy the impressive nickel-finished appearance, while system builders and casual users will appreciate the quality build into this power supply. Benchmark Review load tests the Kingwin Mach 1 ABT-800MA1S 800W Modular PSU for AC power ripple and DC voltage regulation."

More information can be found here.
Wednesday, January 23, 2008
Fujitsu LifeBook S6510 Laptop Review @ Digital Trends
"The Fujitsu Lifebook S6510 lets you have all the features of a regular notebook, while offering the size an ultra-portable."

More information can be found here.
Xigmatek MAC-S3501 DDR/DDR2 Memory Heatspreaders Review
"Xigmatek's MAC-S3501 memory heatspreaders are intended for DDR and DDR2 memory modules, and assuming the sticks of memory you have are bare, installation is a quick affair. A thin strip of jelly silicon thermal interface is laid down on the DRAM, and then the anodized aluminum Xigmatek MAC-S3501 heatspreaders are set in place. If on the other hand your memory already has heatspreaders that are attached with adhesive or frag tape, there's a good chance you may destroy your memory if you attempt to remove the heatspreaders. "

More information can be found here.
ATI Radeon HD 3400, 3600 Series Linux Preview
"AMD has today announced the ATI Radeon HD 3400 and 3600 series graphics processors, which are the budget-minded siblings to the Radeon HD 3850 and 3870. The graphics cards currently now shipping in these series are the HD 3450, HD 3470, and HD 3650. When the Radeon HD 3850 and 3870 were introduced, there wasn't same-day Linux support but it had arrived both in open and closed-source forms relatively quickly, but is that the same story for these lower-end solutions? Will the DisplayPort interface on these graphics cards be supported under Linux? In this article, we have answers to these questions."

More information can be found here.
I4U: ATI Radeon HD 3450 HTPC Video Card Review
"Today we are looking at a new video card form ATI called the Radeon HD 3450. This card is the perfect card for a HTPC machine. The ATI Radeon HD 3450 has 181 million transistors and is built on a 55nm process. The card has the previously mentioned 40 stream processors, four texture units and four render backends. The clock speed for the card is 600MHz on the core and 1GHz on the memory. DirectX 10.1 and ATI PowerPlay are supported as well. One of the best features of the ATI Radeon HD 3450 is the price, the card will retail for $49."

More information can be found here.
ATI Radeon HD 3450 and Radeon HD 3650 Video Cards @ Legit Reviews
"The ATI Radeon HD 3650 is the direct replacement for the ATI Radeon HD 2600 Pro as you can tell from the chart above. The ATI Radeon HD 3650 is active cooled with a core clock of 725MHz and a memory clock of 800MHz and will be available with two kinds of memory ICs - GDDR3 and GDDR2. The slower and older GDDR2 memory chips will be used on the $79 price point cards, while the $99 cards will feature faster GDDR3 memory ICs..."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: ATI Radeon HD 3450, 3470 and 3650 preview
"Starting with RV635, AMD has decided that instead of having separate Pro and XT cards like it did in the Radeon HD 2600 series, it would stick with just one model name in the Radeon HD 3650 series. AMD's Iain McNaughton explained that the company looked at the mainstream segment and asked itself"

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: The Rules of Game Design
"One of the new features we've launched lately on bit-tech has been guest columns. That is, columns written by developers and industry insiders on a rotating monthly schedule. We've had stories and thoughts from every corner of the industry, including budding indie developers like James Silva and writers for established studios, like Simon Hall and Rob Yescombe. After reading Simon Hill's latest column, which talked about difficulty balancing in computer games and why he thinks computer games have got progressively easier, I got thinking. The more I thought about the topic, the more I decided I wanted to do something about it -- partly because I'm a pretty heavy gamer and I like my games to be worth the effort, but mainly because I'm just a nosey busy-body. As I looked into the issue though, the more my mind raged with examples of how games had changed for the worse over the years -- how simple concepts that had once been core to the design of every game were now being forgotten or dismissed. The rules that had governed and created the Golden Axe Age of Gaming were now no longer being obeyed. Naturally, being a bit of presumptuous so-and-so, I decided to shove my nose in and take Simon's complaint to the next level. Thus, I present what I think are the cardinal rules of game design."

More information can be found here.
Tuesday, January 22, 2008
Arctic Cooling Alpine 7 Pro Intel Heatsink Review
"The Alpine 7 Pro retails for less than $15CDN ($15USD), and comes with a pre-installed patch of thermal compound. This is a no-frills heatsink, but it makes some concessions towards lower noise production. In tradition Arctic Cooling fashion, the Alpine 7 Pro is equipped with a fan suspended on rubber shock absorbing posts. The fan is suspended on Fluid Dynamic Bearings, is PWM controlled and rotates from a whisper quiet 500RPM to a moderately audible 2000RPM. Weighing it a 480 grams the Alpine 7 Pro is entirely aluminum, and covered by a 6 year warranty. The real question is whether the Alpine 7 Pro can stand up acoustically, and thermally."

More information can be found here.
I4U: Crucial 4GB (2GB x 2) DDR2-6400 800MHz SODIMM RAM Review
"Today we are looking at 4GB of PC2-6400 SODIMM RAM from Crucial for use in a notebook computer. To get the full benefit from 4GB of RAM, you need to have a 64-bit OS. I was very impressed with the performance of the Crucial 4GB DDR2 PC2-5300 RAM in my Vista Ultimate machine. I wholeheartedly recommend that anyone running Vista seriously consider a RAM upgrade, it can make a huge difference in your performance."

More information can be found here.
Xigmatek NRP-HC1201 1200W @ techPowerUp
"Xigmatek's new NRP-HC1201 power supply offers 1200W of power with support for up to six VGA power connectors. Juice is delivered over four 12V rails with up to 36A per rail. Of course the usual features like long and fully sleeved cables and 80+ high efficiency are present as well."

More information can be found here.
KDE 4.0 Release Event
"This past week was the KDE 4.0 release event taking place at the Googleplex in Mountain View, where around 200 KDE enthusiasts had celebrated this major desktop release as well as discussing the roadmap for KDE and some of the major advantages of the K Desktop Environment."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: First look at the Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI)
"Even though we have seen an MSI motherboard being used with an AMI EFI BIOS last year, we have only now have been informed that MSI has begun trialling more motherboards kitted out with EFI BIOSs. Richard Stewart, UK Marketing Manager at MSI told us that"

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: More Hybrid SLI information
"On Friday, we published a detailed look into Nvidia's Hybrid SLI technology and, if you've read the article, I'm sure you know that there were some questions I had asked that remained unanswered. From my talks with several partners---and also with Nvidia itself---there seemed to be a lot of confusion and nobody really seemed to know //exactly what was going on -- or at least, couldn't talk in great detail about the technology at this early stage. The problem with that was that it left a lot of questions unanswered and it's hard to understand a technology when there is very little information available on it. After talking in London on Friday afternoon with several Nvidia representatives that have worked closely with the engineers on this project, I am pleased to say that the company has answered almost every question I asked of it. There were some questions that the guys couldn't answer themselves; for those questions, I talked on the phone with Drew Henry, General Manager of Nvidia's MCP business -- he was able to answer the questions and provided some vital insight into where Hybrid SLI is going."

More information can be found here.
Thermaltake Toughpower Q-Fan W0163RU 650Watt Modular Power Supply Review @ Tweaknews.net
"With four independent 12V rails providing stable power, it is a fine choice for an overclocked rig. The 140mm Qfan does it job as well with its nearly silent operation even when under heavy load. In fact, this is the quietest PSU I've worked with that wasn't fanless."

More information can be found here.
Monday, January 21, 2008
Xigmatek HDT-S1283 Exposed Heatpipe Base Heatsink Review
"The Xigmatek HDT-S1283 heatsink features three heatpipes in direct contact with the top of the processor, resulting in one very potent CPU cooler. The technique is called Heatpipe Direct Touch, and for today's class of heatspreader capped processors it's the only way to go. The Xigmatek HDT-S1283 heatsink FrostyTech is reviewing today is equipped with vibration absorbing rubber fan posts, a 120mm PWM fan that scales in speed from 1000-2200RPM, and a little spoiler to direct exhaust airflow down towards adjacent motherboard components."

More information can be found here.
Sanyo Denki A11H Online UPS @ techPowerUp
"These days, computer equipment is more sensitive to power disruptions than ever before. The Sanyo Denki A11H is a true on-line UPS that provides constant power to multiple computer systems, and its design allows it to work well with backup generators. We take a look at a 700W tower-style model and the optional LAN Interface card."

More information can be found here.
Diamond Radeon HD 3850 512MB Ruby Edition Video Card @ Legit Reviews
"Diamond Multimedia doubled the on-board GDDR3 memory from 256MB to 512MB on the Diamond Radeon HD 3850 512MB Ruby Edition Video Card, which should significantly help frame buffer performance in gaming, but that isn't all they did. They also tossed the old single slot cooler and went with a larger and improved cooling system that lowered temperatures across the board. To top it all off they designed their own PCB! As you can see, Diamond went back to the drawing board and came up with a video card that should impress most of the ATI fans out there..."

More information can be found here.
I4U: ASUS EAH3850 Top ATI HD 3850 Video Card Review
"The Asus EAH3850 Top is factory overclocked and has a clock speed of 730MHz on the core and 1.9GHz on the memory. The card uses 256MB of DDR3 RAM and is built on a 55nm fabrication process. One of the nicest features of the Asus EAH3850 Top is the built-in 5.1surround sound that allows video and audio out on an HDMI cable."

More information can be found here.
ASUS Maximus Formula (Non-SE) @ Bjorn3D
"Today we intend to not only review the ASUS® Maximus Formula but perform the review using a somewhat different approach that we hope is a precursor to something really unique and exciting for our readers. We'll detail the changes we've made when we get to the 'Testing Methodology' section of the review where the change actually are implemented. Up until then the format of our review of the Maximus formula will remain essentially the same. Please join us in our pursuit of presenting the Maximus Formula from a much broader and complete perspective."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: The Weighted Companion PC - a tribute to Portal
"When it comes to great new games, one of the first thoughts on anyone's mind is"

More information can be found here.
Lexar 8GB ExpressCard SSD Review @ XtremeComputing
"although it didn’t operate as fast as the USB drive, the power consumption is where the benefits were and for people on the move that is important. I also used the drive under vista, via vista boost and there was a slight increase in performance when opening and shutting files I was working with, so a performance boost without a huge power hit."

More information can be found here.
Sunday, January 20, 2008
Seagate FreeAgent Pro 160GB Review @ Digital Trends
"Take your office with you thanks to the Seagate FreeAgent Pro hard drive, available in a number of sizes."

More information can be found here.
ET: Quake Wars Threaded Renderer
"Accompanied by an updated Windows release, last week id Software had released its Enemy Territory: Quake Wars v1.4 update for Linux. We have previously shared most of the details surrounding this major ET: Quake Wars update with the same changes as the Windows build. One of the most interesting features, however, is the new threaded renderer for improved multi-core performance."

More information can be found here.
SimpleTech PC3-10600 DDR3 1333MHz S1024R5NP2QA @ BmR
"Of all the RAM kits we have reviewed thus far in our High-Speed DDR3 Overclocking and Review Series, practically every set has been aimed towards performance enthusiasts and overclockers. But Benchmark Reviews isn't going to ignore our roots within the system builder and reseller community. SimpleTech offers OEM system builders and GSA suppliers with a solid PC3-10600 DDR3 1333MHz S1024R5NP2QA RAM kit for the Intel P35/X38/P45/X48 chipsets."

More information can be found here.
Westone UM1 Earphones @ techPowerUp
"The Westone UM1 in-ear-monitors are aimed at people wanting good sound quality on the move without having to spend several hundreds of dollars. With a price of $109 they are Westone's contribution to a highly competitive price segment."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Noctua NH-U12P
"As you’ve seen on the previous page, the Noctua NH-U12P is a great performer and this isn’t just down to the improved fan that the company has designed. Along with better performance, you also get absolutely everything you would expect – better compatibility, better corrosion resistance, premium thermal paste, the improved fan, extra clips for another fan, U.L.N.A. and even tools to install it. Top that with a cherry flavoured warranty of six years, and I literally cannot think of anything else you'd need from a heatsink, Noctua has //every base covered. If you have an uncompromising fetish for silence, then there's no other choice: you have to get the Noctua, or, at least its £15 fan. After all given that there are many heatpiped heatsinks already on the market you could just throw the NH-P12 120mm fan on any one of these for a //similar effect. At £15 a pop, the NH-P12 is the Crème de la Crème of fans and an investment and a half on top of that heatsink purchase. And even if you can match the Noctua's 19dB, like the Zerotherm Nirvana NV120 at its lowest setting, there's still a performance difference in favour of the Noctua. There's never been a truer time to cite the old"

More information can be found here.
Saturday, January 19, 2008
bit-tech News: Conflict: Denied Ops - hands on
"The PC game looked the worst of all, as if it had been washed out and reduced to a blander version of the original. At first we attributed this to low settings or a dodgy screen, but a little prying when nobody was looking revealed that everything was maxed out correctly. The options menu boasted per-pixel lighting, HDR, high texture qualities and heat haze shaders -- all toggled up to the highest settings. Yet, the PC version still looked a bit ropey despite the increased framerate. In the end, it's clear that //Conflict: Denied Ops is a solid, if uninspired, shooter that has a few problems still holding it back. However, since these flaws mostly centre on the balancing within the game's mechanics, they should prove relatively easy to fix before the game is released. //Conflict: Denied Ops sets out to be a casual FPS game suitable for light play and fun-times, not for hardcore appeal and longevity, and in that respect it's very close to succeeding at what it sets out to do. If a casual FPS game is the type of thing you think you might be interested in, or if you regularly find yourself having a few beers and flipping on the Xbox for some split screen fun, then //Conflict: Denied Ops may well be a game you want to keep an eye on."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Cranium Kabookii review
"It's quite hard to know what to make of Cranium Kabookii because, while to my mind it is clearly the best third-party party game available for the Wii, it's not strikingly awesome on its own. The mini games themselves range from inventive and fun to derived and damningly difficult -- though they do mostly edge towards the former, thankfully. Games like //Cloodle prove themselves to be fairly fun and repeatable and //Cranium Kabookii is a game with a certain amount of replayability because of that. However, at the same time, the game is full of wasted potential and gameplay that's too simple, often seemingly rewarding players arbitrarily. Despite the colourful, vibrant presentation the game also fails to provide anything that is suitably engaging visually. The developers would have done a lot better to simply recreate the board from the board game rather than to feature coloured tokens. All of the above is forgivable for the most part though -- what isn't though is the extremely limited scope for play. You can only play //Cranium Kabookii if you have four people with you and, even then, you can only play the main game mode. There's nothing to unlock and the options don't even let you alter the difficulty of the game. The result is a game which, while fun, could quickly get old for many and which seems to jump between too hard and too easy a bit too much. If you've got a group of people with a wide range of ages and are looking for a multiplayer game that kids can manage then //Cranium Kabookii is just what you'd want to look at buying. If you want something a little more flexible and adult-aimed though then you'd be better off keeping your wallet in your pocket."

More information can be found here.
Insider: Green Compatibility A Pure Marketing Play @ CoolTechZone.com
"Green compatible products are all the rage these days, and technology companies are tripping over one another to announce their commitment to eco-friendly devices. It sounds all nice and cute, but the reality: it's a downright marketing play. Nothing more, nothing less."

More information can be found here.
Zune: The Rising iPod Killer @ CoolTechZone.com
"A couple of days ago, we declared iPod the ultimate winner with no portable music players to take it down. However, we need to make an exception for Microsoft. As surprising as it is, at CES 2008, Microsoft's Zune is really starting to emerge as a serious threat to Apple's crown jewel. Sure, it's not going to capture the market rapidly and growth will be gradual, but Microsoft has the right ingredients. Just when Microsoft announced Xbox and its official entry in the gaming space, everybody laughed at the idea. And the joke become even hilarious after Microsoft announced its loss on a per unit basis, and how wide that was."

More information can be found here.
2008: Another Slow Year for Hard Drives @ CoolTechZone.com
"We declared 2008 the year of Solid State Storage, but what about your standard, run-of-the-mill hard drives? What's going to happen in that part of the industry? In one word: nothing. That's right, the ever depressing industry is going to relax with normal hard drives and focus their entire attention on SSD units. It makes sense, but the price point on SSDs is not going to be low enough for mainstream adoption, at least not this year. For those of us who are going to stick with platter-based drives, we would still like to see some innovation take place. No such luck, said the companies we talked to at CES 2008."

More information can be found here.
Why OS X Has No "Paint" from Windows @ OSWeekly.com
"Paint"

More information can be found here.
Why New Linux Users Are Frustrated @ OSWeekly.com
"Users by the truck load fill various user forums with problem topics in Linux despite widely available support documents available online. Today, I will talk about a few key areas that would solve a number of problems if they were to be addressed in the open."

More information can be found here.
What OS X and Linux Can Learn from OLPC @ OSWeekly.com
"I haven’t really been keeping track of how the OLPC project has been evolving for the past few months, honesty. I truly admire the motivation behind what they’re doing, and I wish them all the best, so when I heard about their Give One Get One program, I was instantly intrigued."

More information can be found here.
Why You Shouldn't Upgrade Your OS @ OSWeekly.com
"I don't care whether or not you are thinking of using Vista, OS X or Linux. As a personal rule, I rarely upgrade until any release has been out for at least 6 months. Why is this? Flash back to the two issues (not patched, I believe) with OS X Leopard, the vast issues with Vista (mostly patched, again) and of course, distributions like Ubuntu that almost always have a laundry list of bugs until the next LTS (Long-Term Support) release comes out."

More information can be found here.
Friday, January 18, 2008
BlueAnt X5 Stereo Bluetooth Headset Review @ Legit Reviews
"The BlueAnt X5 Stereo Bluetooth Headset is designed for not only those Bluetooth devices that support the A2DP Profile natively, but those audio devices that you want experience wirelessly. BlueAnt incorporates a small dongle that can be used with any 3.5mm jack to bridge the sound between audio device and X5 headphones. With a retail price of $149, BlueAnt tries to deliver a complete package to the user and prepares them for almost any situation one can think of. How well does the BlueAnt X5 stack up against the Motorola and Plantronics? Read on..."

More information can be found here.
Danger Den MC-TDX Waterblock @ techPowerUp
"Danger Den redesigned the TDX to improve its performance on multiple-core CPUs. This new version, dubbed the MC-TDX, features 240 pins above the CPU core area to help dissipate heat. The rest of the design is classic TDX, with its offset outlet barb, acrylic top and simple mounting hardware."

More information can be found here.
Mapower MAP-OT21 2.5 Inch eSATA / USB Enclosure Review @ Bigbruin.com
"The Mapower MAP-OT21 2.5 Inch eSATA / USB Enclosure features a one touch backup button that works through software found on the included CD. The "PCClone EX Lite" software doesn't do anything fancy like some other backup software I have used, but the simplicity is a strong point. The whole thing occupies less than 11MB on disk, and it allows you to easily setup your profile of what you would like backed up."

More information can be found here.
Plextor PX-PH160US @ Bjorn3D
"While USB-flash drives have both dropped in price and increased in size they still are far too small if you need to carry around anything larger than some images or documents. The regular external hard drives of course are an alternative but while they do have the storage space they also are big, heavy and need extra power thus making them less useful for the mobile computer user."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Nvidia's Hybrid SLI technology
"On the whole then, I'm quite excited by the prospects of Hybrid SLI but I can't help but feel that there are some things that Nvidia could have improved in hardware---and I'm not even considering software at this point because it's early days---to make the technology that bit more appealing. The real kicker for me is the display support on the nForce 700a series motherboards because, from everything I've seen so far, there is only one digital output available. That's not good for anyone who runs dual digital displays---like me for example---because you either leave your power hungry graphics card turned on with the displays plugged into the digital ports on it, rather destroying the point of having HybridPower technology in the first place. Alternatively, you could run one of the displays on the analogue VGA port on the motherboard and the picture quality is awful. With dual digital outputs, you can at least use one or two DVI-to-VGA converter(s) to connect your CRT monitors up to the motherboard -- and the best part of it is that the picture looks just as good when you use a DVI-to-VGA converter. I have asked Nvidia why it made this design decision, but my questions on the subject are yet to be answered -- I've been promised an answer though, so I will update this when one arrives. Hopefully, I'm wrong and the chipset does actually support dual digital displays but given how long it's taken to get an answer, I am not too confident in that being the case. Aside from this point though, Hybrid SLI looks to be an incredibly sound technology on paper, but we're going to have to reserve final judgement until we actually have hardware (and drivers) to test this properly."

More information can be found here.
Thursday, January 17, 2008
ASUS P5K3 Deluxe WiFi-AP Intel P35 Motherboard @ BmR
"Market forecasts predict DDR3 memory poised to replace its predecessor DDR2 as the main volume product for 2008. Already aware of this, memory chip manufacturers like Micron, Samsung, Hynix, and Qimonda have begun tooling up for mass production. As a result we should finally start to see the dizzying prices of DDR3 come down - being affordable will no doubt help to spur adoption in the market. With price drops looming, many will be looking for quality motherboards suitable for high-speed DDR3. With this in mind Benchmark Reviews thought it would be of interest to examine one of the more mature DDR3 based motherboard offerings on the market today; the ASUS P5K3 Deluxe Wi-Fi-AP Motherboard based on the Intel P35 chipset."

More information can be found here.
Garmin nuvi 350 Review @ Digital Trends
"Garmin's pocket-sized nuvi 350 is a portable GPS unit that aims to be more than just a GPS."

More information can be found here.
Review: Tagan ICY BOX IB-3220 @ GideonTech.com
"Following in the ICY BOX line, Tagan has come out with another external enclosure in the same family of products. The original ICY BOX I looked at earlier this year was a nice product that supported a single 2.5"

More information can be found here.
Diamond Multimedia HD 3850 Ruby Edition 512MB @ techPowerUp
"Diamond has designed their HD 3850 Ruby Edition with additional cooling performance in mind. Their cooler is a custom dual-slot solution which does quite a good job at keeping the card cool. In addition to that the memory has been doubled to 512 MB of GDDR3."

More information can be found here.
I4U: Logitech Harmony One Review
"The Harmony One can control up to 15 home theater and home automation devices. All you need to know about your components to program them into the remote is the brand and model number. You choose the brand from a drop down list with a huge amount of choices, there were companies listed I had never heard of before. After choosing the brand you put in the model number and you are ready to program."

More information can be found here.
Foxconn X38A Motherboard Review @ Legit Reviews
"The Foxconn X38A motherboard offers everything you could want out of an Intel X38 Express chipset based board. After you get past all the standard X38 features such as dual Lan, HD audio, PCIe-Gen 2.0, the board goes the extra mile of adding in dual ram compatibility. This lets you take advantage of great DDR2 prices right now, with the added piece of mind of future upgradeability when DDR3 prices stabilize. When you factor in that this comes at no apparent cost to performance, you can’t really ask for more..."

More information can be found here.
Noctua NT-H1 Thermal Compound @ techPowerUp
"Noctua recently released their new NT-H1 thermal compound. This new thermal interface material is designed to give maximum performance while being simple to use. Best of all, it is ready to use immediately and does not require a "burn-in" time like the other manufacturer's products. With a long storage life, long-term stability on the CPU, being non-conductive and being suitable for compressor cooling, this thermal compound seems to have it all."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: AMD Phenom 9600 Black Edition
"From the results, if you can get 2.6GHz+ from one it should scale wonderfully, however given the problems AMD seems to be having with scaling its retail CPUs means it looks like getting a good chip is very much luck of the draw. And it could turn out to be an expensive mistake if you consider that every Intel Core 2-based CPU we've ever used has easily achieved 3GHz. We'd love to have some solid competition and choice again, especially for us enthusiasts but it unfortunately just doesn't look to be the case. What we risk is the current price difference between Q6600 and Q6700 - more than double for an extra 266MHz. That's only because the Phenom 9600 loosely relates to the performance of the Core 2 Quad Q6600 and Intel wants to be super-competitive. With Penryn CPUs literally just weeks away - more specifically, the new dual core Wolfdales, which should be positively bursting with potential, a wise investment for your hard earned cash would be to still overclock an Intel processor."

More information can be found here.
Wednesday, January 16, 2008
Interview with Antec Senior VP Scott Richards @ NordicHardware
"Lastly, as a company that has always strived to make the best quality possible for the money invested, it does drive us at Antec a bit crazy when we see consumers run their power supply right on the line of available power. The excess heat and having components running constantly on the ragged edge can inhibit overall performance and substantially shorten the life span of the PSU."

More information can be found here.
I4U: Benchmarking the AMD Spider Platform
"Today we are looking at a Spider platform computer system from AMD. This particular machine is running a Phenom 2.4GHz processor in an Asus M3A32-MVP Deluxe mainboard with a single ATI HD 3850 graphics card. I used the computer in my daily activities on average ten hours a day for nearly a month. I found that in normal situations like editing large photos, surfing the web and rendering video the AMD spider platform is every bit as speedy as my Intel based test machine with much higher specifications."

More information can be found here.
GeForce 8800 GTS 512MB Roundup - Albatron, eVGA and XFX @ Legit Reviews
"The Albatron, EVGA and XFX GeForce 8800 GTS 512MB video cards are all great cards that can play all the current games and overclock like no other. As you saw from the testing the different core clock, memory clock and shader clock frequencies vary from card to card and did impact performance. Higher clock frequencies did improve performance as the XFX card took the lead in nearly every single benchmark..."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Gaming in the real world
"A question that's often asked is how much of what we might experience in a real life situation is reflected in those games that claim to be as close to real as possible? Having spent most of my working life in the Armed Forces and spending most of my spare time fragging in 'realistic' 3D environments, I believe I'm in a position where I am pretty qualified to answer that question. So, bearing this in mind, I thought I'd put metaphoric pen to paper and see if I could come up with an answer. In fact, I plan to explore the blurring of realism in the gaming world in a series of articles as this particular subject is one that is close to my heart. The quandary facing the games publishers has only become more apparent as gamers have become more demanding for perfection and more realism thanks to more advanced graphics. Should the publishers make a game that is a reflection of fact or one that is based on perceived fact? To explain this, we will be talking about one of my favourite genres: the First Person Shooter and, more specifically, ones that use history or current events to set the scene for the action."

More information can be found here.
Patriot X-Porter XT Boost 32GB USB Pen Drive review@ XtremeComputing
"Well 32gb on a small pen drive is a lot, it really also shows how far things have come since we first saw the USB 64mb that we marvelled at, and now we have 32gig ones, with 64gig just around the corner. I have to admit I am very impressed with what I have in my hands, as it has many uses from presentations with full size high res photos, to storing a whole season of your favourite series to take away with you, or if you’re a driver and you have a head unit with USB, well you could fit enough music to listen to on a drive around the world."

More information can be found here.
The State of Google's Everex Linux PCs @ OSWeekly.com
"It was only a short time ago I wrote a piece detailing my initial thoughts on the little Everex boxes running a Google branded OS (Linux) that magically had no actual Google fingerprints anywhere on it at all. Today, I learned that their main distributor, Wal-Mart, has completely sold out of them. I have to admit, I'm speechless."

More information can be found here.
Has Microsoft Learned Anything from Vista Failure? @ OSWeekly.com
"Admittedly, it may not have been as poor a performer as Windows Me, but the facts are that Windows Vista lost a lot of Windows users to other platforms. Even worse, many of them were fairly high profile users."

More information can be found here.
The Importance of Cross Platform Compatibility @ OSWeekly.com
"I’ve gone on and on about how important cross-platform software really is in the past, and my mission to spread the word about its importance will continue. It can be frustrating to hear about a great application, become intrigued by its features and functionality, and then find out that it’s only available for one operating system. Oh, the humanity!"

More information can be found here.
Apple's OS X Takes Over International Market @ OSWeekly.com
"No matter how you cut it, OS X is doing fantastic in the United States. People that didn’t care about it before now have a reason to care because of Leopard and the disappointing reception of Vista. Nowadays, whenever I go to a technology conference or a place where people can be seen with their laptops (such as a Starbucks), I see more Macs than other competitive brands, and this is quite a change from about five to ten years ago. If you had a Mac then, you’d be viewed as somewhat of an outcast, but not anymore. OS X has truly helped to change the name of the game."

More information can be found here.
Apple iPod Declared Winner at CES @ CoolTechZone.com
"Unlike previous years at CES, when everyone was trying to dethrone the iPod with their"

More information can be found here.
HD DVD, Blu-Ray Media to Cost ONLY $5 Per Disc in 2008 @ CoolTechZone.com
"As HD DVD and Blu-Ray debate tirelessly raged on at CES, some disc makers said they expect cost-per-disc for HD DVD and Blu-Ray media to fall to $5-ish levels. We were surprised to hear these numbers considering last year's figure of double digit prices, one of the halting points for new format growth."

More information can be found here.
HD DVD Future Continues to be Unknown @ CoolTechZone.com
"Toshiba took a costly hit last week at CES when Time Warner took their partnership away from HD DVD to Blu-Ray exclusively. This happened just when CES was about to take place, putting Toshiba in an awkward position. You see, Toshiba had invested a lot of capital promoting HD DVD at the world's largest tradeshow, and all of those marketing dollars went from a serious campaign to a humorous irony with show attendees mocking HD DVD."

More information can be found here.
Hiper HPU-5K880 and HPU-5B680 Type R Mk II PSU's @ BmR
"Fresh from our review of the HPU-4M880/HPU-4M630 Type M Series,Hiper returns with an all new concept for power supply units. By combining the passive cooling of an open-grill chassis design with a set of integrated High-Speed USB ports, Hiper introduces their Type R Mk-II power supplies in 680W and 880W versions. Benchmark Reviews reveals the innovative HPU-5K880 & HPU-5B680 PSU's with our set of power regulation tests."

More information can be found here.
Tuesday, January 15, 2008
Paradigm Monitor 7 and UltraCube 10 Review @ Digital Trends
"The Monitor 7/UltraCube 10 system sounds great and carries a very affordable price tag."

More information can be found here.
ASRock 4Core1600P35-WiFi+
"For years ASRock has been regarded as very much a budget motherboard manufacturer, while over time they've begun to introduce motherboards with more enthusiast-level features and even products that are more overclocker-friendly. It wasn't until recently that they finally started offering Gigabit ethernet and IEEE-1394a Firewire on their motherboards, but this month with their 4Core1600P35-WiFi+ they have made another step forward showing that they are able to offer an economically-priced motherboard with Intel's P35 Chipset and even integrated 802.11g WiFi. We have our hands on the ASRock 4Core1600P35-WiFi+ for testing and we will be seeing how well this P35 creation performs on Linux."

More information can be found here.
Westone UM2 Earphones @ techPowerUp
"With a price of around $300 you can expect quite some performance from the Westone UM2 Earphones. They are designed as in-ear-monitors and feature two high-end drivers aimed at people that are not willing to accept compromise."

More information can be found here.
Xigmatek HDT-S983 Exposed Heatpipe-Base Heatsink Review
"In this review Frostytech is testing out Xigmatek's new HDT-S983 heatsink, an innovative thermal solution that employs sculpted & textured aluminum fins, and large copper heatpipes that make direct contact with the CPU. If you take the Xigmatek HDT-S983 and look at the bottom you'll see an aluminum base with three 8.5mm wide grooves cut deeply into it. Set snugly within each groove is an 8mm diameter copper heat pipe, which has been flattened so everything is flush. Instead of using a bulky copper plate, Xigmatek use the superior heat conducting capabilities of heat pipes to conduct heat away from the core of an AMD or Intel processor."

More information can be found here.
Samsung SyncMaster 245T 24-Inch LCD Monitor Review @ Tweaknews.net
"Overall the 245T brings much more to the table than any standard computer monitor on the market and this is directly apparent in its premium price. With industry leading color reproduction, excellent contrast and clarity to take advantage of with a literally a buffet of video connections, the 245T would be best described as swiss army monitor option in the 24"

More information can be found here.
OCZ Technology PC3-10666 ReaperX HPC 2GB DDR3 Kit Review @ Bigbruin.com
"With the 6-5-5-18 timings, the OCZ Technology 2GB PC3-10666 ReaperX HPC DDR3 Dual Channel Memory Kit is very impressive right out of the package at 1333MHz. Testing showed that it can outperform other comparable memory with looser timings, providing a quick plug-and-play upgrade for those who aren't all that into overclocking and tweaking their BIOS."

More information can be found here.
Crucial Ballistix DDR3-1600 @ Bjorn3D
"If you are a computer enthusiast and I'd like to think at heart we all are, then you will have noticed every few years we are introduced to a new memory technology. It will start out expensive and rare then eventually become affordable and mainstream. Which is where we are now with DDR2. Just as we get comfortable it is supplanted by a new memory technology that starts the cycle all over again. Every time the cycle begins we all get a little excited at the possibilities the new memory can bring and what wonders it will behold. But we also ask ourselves 'Is it for me?', 'Should I upgrade now or wait?'. These are valid questions that everyone should ask themselves when a new product arrives and that is what I am here to help you with today."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Climbing The Difficulty Curve
"There has been a growing trend over the last few years to make games that are easy enough for every player to finish them. In many ways this is a positive development which reflects the maturity of the industry and the mainstream nature of the audience who regularly play games. It also reflects publisher desires to create mass market, accessible products which can generate maximum profit for them. However today I'm posing the question"

More information can be found here.
Monday, January 14, 2008
Gateway P-171XL FX Edition Review @ Digital Trends
"The Gateway P-171 XL FX laptop is a mean gaming machine that goes head-to-head with the best out there."

More information can be found here.
Eutanasia - Small Dimension Aluminum Case Mod by Metku.net
"After getting tired with my old Antec Sonata II case, I really wanted to build something original for myself. The basic guidelines for the case were simple. As this case was going to be built to be used at Lan-parties, the case should be small, simple, durable, upgradeable and it still should be able to house a powerful system."

More information can be found here.
Gigabyte 3D Mercury Water Cooled Case
"Water cooling used to be a very daunting task for all but the most experienced enthusiasts. It required time, dedication, and knowledge of many different types of components, and installing them in an orderly, professional matter was a very time consuming process. Many have simply jumped ship, including me, and returned to air-based cooling solutions over the past years. But nowadays, water cooling is becoming more and more accessible. Just about every vendor involved in the cooling business provides all-in-one systems, 5.25"

More information can be found here.
Auras LPT-700 Heatsink Review
"The Auras LPT-700 is an Intel-only socket 775 heatsink designed for quiet cooling. The LPT-700 is equipped with a 92mm PWM fan that scales in speed from 700-2100RPM with compatible motherboards, and at its fastest speed is moderately audible. Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) compatible fans are noted by their 4-pin power connectors, and what PWM does is enable the BIOS to directly control fan speed. Versatility is the key to any good heatsink, and the PWM approach ensures you computer can keep itself cool when under load, yet decrease fan noise when it isn't."

More information can be found here.
I4U: Zagg iPhone Full Body invisibleSHIELD Review
"The touch screen functions just as well with the Apple iPhone Full Body invisibleSHIELD installed as it did without the film. The feel of the touch screen is changed a bit because the Apple iPhone Full Body invisibleSHIELD is not a slick feeling as the glass screen is alone."

More information can be found here.
Ultra M998 Mid-Tower Case at Modders-Inc
"The M998 brings several great features to the table like an aluminum chassis, 11 drive bays, removable motherboard tray, casters, and offers complete accessibility to your hardware just to name a few."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: CES 2008 - Understanding Industry Trends
"In the financial world, we talk a lot about trends. Trends are pretty fascinating things actually...it's the idea that, given a little know-how of what to look for, you can predict the move of an entire sector of the market. The"

More information can be found here.
Zerotherm Hurricane HC92 CU 8800 VGA Cooler Review @ Tweaknews.net
"In the final analysis, ZEROtherm's Hurricane HC92 Cu 8800 VGA cooler showed a marked improvement over the OEM solution while adding some style and bling into the mix. The inclusion of a fan speed controller, along with the three configuration options, gives the user some control over cooling performance and noise levels; always a plus."

More information can be found here.
Akasa Integral P2NES 2.5 esata/USB enclosure Review @ XtremeComputing
"For this review I will be looking at a new product from Akasa, the Akasa Integral P2NES, which is a hard drive enclosure, not for your normal 3½” drives but a 2½” laptop drive. It is also comes with eSata and usb2 connectivity so I am expecting some reasonable file transfer speeds."

More information can be found here.
ULTRA Stackable @ Bjorn3D
"A quick glance underneath my desk (and I am sure that it’s the same for most of you guys out there), you will find that it’s filled with cables and power bricks. There are connectors for the desktop, the monitor, a router, an external storage, laptop connector, Ipod charger, cell phone charger, speaker, modem, etc.... In fact, two six plug power strip is not even enough for my needs and I constantly finding myself unplug one connector for other devices. How unfortunate for the gadget junkies like us who live in the tech world."

More information can be found here.
High-Definition Video for MP3 Players Coming Soon @ CoolTechZone.com
"Since we had a lot of time at CES this year, thanks to lackluster exhibitors, we talked a lot about the future (like we wouldn't normally). These days, music players are a plenty, but there's nothing that's truly disruptive about them. Even the cheapest (and we mean that with utmost respect) of the bunch can display photos, playback audio/video and support in-line recording. What makes one better than the other? Audio quality could be a distinguishing factor only if mainstream consumers could hear the difference. Many of them continue to sport stock earphones, so asking them to compare audio quality between two MP3 players is stretching too much. Besides, who really buys anything other than the iconic iPod these days anyways?"

More information can be found here.
CES 2008 Bores Attendees @ CoolTechZone.com
"Can you say boring? My question to CEA, the organizers of CES: what happened? CES 2008 was a terrible show with nothing exciting to show for it. The mood on the show floor was dull with the same old, same old gadgetry from last year. This is supposed to be the largest and most prominent platform for the technology industry and boredom is what we got. Everything from Bill Gates' last CES appearance before his retirement to minor updates to last year's products. What a disappointment and a waste of an usually worthwhile trip!"

More information can be found here.
2008: The Future of Solid State Storage @ CoolTechZone.com
"In addition to HDTV's, solid state storage drives made their way to CES as well, albeit in limited quantity. There was a lot of speculation on the show floor regarding SSD and companies were loaded with far-fetched answers. However, we can't blame them for our insistence on them predicting the future of SSD going forward."

More information can be found here.
Panasonic's 150-inch Plasma to Cost $150,000 @ CoolTechZone.com
"In an effort to prove its technological prowess, Panasonic rocked CES 2008 with the world's largest plasma at 150-inches. Previous year's record was at 104-inches with this year's second place winners (yes, there were multiple) coming in at a distant 108-inches. Whew, what a sight!"

More information can be found here.
Technology Theme of 2008: Sexy Looks @ CoolTechZone.com
"We are at a point where the technology industry is all about looks and sex appeal. At least that's what the companies are saying. We could choose to believe them knowing that a lot of consumers are demanding sleek electronics, instead of beige, boring boxes hosting the hardware, but, as you know by now, CES was terrible this year, and a lot of companies resorted to changing a few things here and there to add flair to their existing product line. That could be another factor. Either way, sexy looks were all the rage this year. And that looks to be the future."

More information can be found here.
5 Things Wrong With Microsoft Authorized Refurbisher Program (MAR) @ OSWeekly.com
"With the growing popularity of refurbished PCs with Linux distributions like Ubuntu, Puppy Linux, Damn Small Linux and so on, Microsoft has tossed their hat into the ring as well. While some people have rolled their eyes at the very idea, I see nothing wrong with it. If Microsoft wants to get into the refurbished market, more power to them. It's just a shame that they have the following hurdles in place for their potential"

More information can be found here.
First Look: Android Disappoints @ OSWeekly.com
"To a normal person, an Android would bring to mind a robot with human features, but for those of us keeping track of the news coming out of Google these days, it means a new open source mobile platform from the Open Handset Alliance. It was announced only a short time ago, but as you can expect from something of this magnitude, word spread quickly, and further developments are coming down the pipeline even quicker."

More information can be found here.
Why Apple Should Advertise Leopard on TV @ OSWeekly.com
"Apple has been doing a great job at advertising in clever ways, but when it comes time to actually show the benefits that come with using their products in these advertisements, they fall flat on their face. Most of us have more than a casual understanding of Apple’s products, and we at least know what they can and cannot do. With that said, not everyone has the luxury of that knowledge, and some people are as clueless as can be. They know they can use the computers to get on the Internet, but that’s about where it ends for them."

More information can be found here.
Why Linux Users Should Be Furious At BBC @ OSWeekly.com
"Recently the BBC had a bit of a wake up call regarding numbers and how many Linux users were really out there. Why does any of this matter? It has to do with something the BBC provides called the iPlayer. Seriously, relying on ActiveX is so"

More information can be found here.
2008 International CES Computer Technology Highlights @ BmR
"The 2008 International CES is now finished, and while exhibitors use the weekend to tear-down booths there are as many writers who will feverishly extol the numerous technology displays viewed over the past week. Benchmark Reviews was after the only the most notable computer technology highlights and announcements at the show, and this article reveals what we believe to be the most important innovations for Q1/Q2 2008."

More information can be found here.
Fujifilm FinePix F50fd Review @ Digital Trends
"The Fujifilm FinePix F50fd is a 12MP camera that features a 3x image stabilization and face detection."

More information can be found here.
Saturday, January 12, 2008
Goldmund's Media Room: A Dream For Audiophiles
"Last week I had received a unique CES invitation from Rogers & Cowan, a PR firm representing an array of entertainment and technology companies, about one of their clients that advertises itself as the makers of the"

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Sam and Max: Moai Better Blues
"The main problem with Sam & Max Season Two: Moai Better Blues is one of length. No matter what others may tell you, length is everything and with the game only lasting two or three hours, the fun is over just as you're starting to get into the game. This was a problem with / /Season One and it's still a problem with //Season Two. I suppose it's not really a criticism as such, more testament to the quality of the game that you don't really want it to end when it does. There's a trade-off to be made between the episodic nature of the game and length of the game though, and this time the episodic argument won. Despite Telltale Games having made some changes to the games based on user feedback, the main niggle still exists: Sam still walks like he should be using a walking stick. While it is possible to make him run, this doesn't work on every screen and more often than not, you're left twiddling your thumbs while Sam ambles from one side of the screen to the next. / /Sam & Max: Moai Better Blues is still an adventure game at heart, and as such doesn't really bring anything new to the genre, but it still shines on so many levels that you're willing to overlook the few flaws. If you're //really bothered about the length then you could always grab the seasonpack in a few months time. Telltale Games are to be applauded for both showing us at the adventure game isn't dead and that episodic gaming can be successful. Ultimately, its biggest flaw is also its biggest advantage: the game is short enough to be enjoyable but not so long that it drags on."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Thermaltake Armour+ case review
"On the one hand the case is (and I'm finally just going to come out and say it) pretty ugly. At the same time though it performs decently in the thermal performance tests, has plenty of room in it and also is incredibly beefy in terms of the amount of hardware it can hold. / /But it's pretty ugly. And noisy. When it comes down to it though, it's obvious that only a certain type of person is going to be interested in the Armour+ - those who really enjoy showing off their over stylised cases at big LAN events. It's / /all about the e-peen. The ThermalTake Armour+ is a good case and ticks nearly all the boxes, but for me personally it is let down by a horrible look, bizarre doors which really, honestly, confound me and the fact that it's a bit too noisy. Factor into that the price as well, realising that for £20 less you could get a far classier and quiter case like the Antec P182 ($60 less in the US) and the ThermalTake Armour+ is a bit less overwhelming. Still, it's a decent enough chassis I suppose, so if you can look past the noise or if you happen to think that the design is actually quite snazzy then you may do well to big one up before the design stops evolving and just goes extinct instead."

More information can be found here.
Super Talent PC14400 1800Mhz DDR3 2GB Memory Kit Review @ Tweaknews.net
"The Super Talent PC3-14400 CL7-7-7-21 High-Speed DDR3 1800MHz 2x1GB RAM kit W1800UX2GP is like a fine wine, it's not going to be appeasing to all types of taste pallets. This ram is defiantly tailor made for the high-end enthusiast that wants the fastest memory performance possible. One quick glance at spec sheets, you will find few boards at this time list official 1800MHz support."

More information can be found here.
Friday, January 11, 2008
OCZ Vendetta Exposed Heatpipe-Base Heatsink Review
"OCZ's broad market availability means you won't have a hard time tracking down the Vendetta heatsink in your neck of the woods. The Xigamtek HDT-S983 was a great heatsink, and the OCZ Vendetta cooler will certainly follow in its footsteps. The OCZ Vendetta heatsink FrostyTech is reviewing today is equipped with soft rubber vibration absorbing fan posts, and a 92mm PWM fan that spins at 1200-2800RPM, and some rather unique fin geometry."

More information can be found here.
Benchmark Reviews Experiences 2008 International CES
"This is my short story of a first year visit to the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) which began in Las Vegas, Nevada on January 7th, 2008. Prior to starting Benchmark Reviews in March 2007, I had only heard of the aftermath and accolades from the stories handed down from affiliate webmasters from the previous years' CES. Since I am a resident of Nevada, I feel the gravitational pull of Las Vegas more than a few times per year; most in part to my competitions twice per year in the Grapplers Quest National Tournaments. But this year I was on a mission: meet the manufacturers, ask the important questions, and attend the parties. This is a diary of the most interesting experiences while I attended the 2008 International CES convention, and the lessons I learned the hard way. This article is dedicated to anyone who is considering, planning, or just slightly curious in joining the crowd in Sin City."

More information can be found here.
Thursday, January 10, 2008
Glacialtech Igloo 5750 PWM Heatsink Review
"In this review Frostytech is testing out Glacialtech's new Igloo 5750 PWM heatsink - a versatile CPU cooler with twin Pulse Width Modulation controlled 92mm fans and a single power cord for the sake of convenience. The Igloo 5750 PWM heatsink and previously reviewed Igloo 5750 Silent are identical models, except for the fans used. If you read that review, feel free to jump ahead to the acoustic and thermal test results for the full low down. Glacialtech's Igloo 5750 PWM heatsink accomodates both socket 775 Intel and AMD K8 processors (socket 754/939/940/AM2/AM2+)."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: XFX nForce 780i SLI
"It may look better, but it also costs £20 more than an XFX nForce 680i SLI and we'd certainly be tempted to sit back and wait to see if the nForce 780i SLI suffers from the same significantly high number of board deaths that the nForce 680i SLI had - personally I'd choose a company with a good RMA service and warranty period, just to be safe. In that respect, XFX's two year warranty is clearly outshone by its American alternative, EVGA, which offers a fantastic and industry leading ten year warranty. The nForce 780i SLI suffers from stuff that just hasn't been updated; no solid aluminium capacitors, no re-FABed chipsets on a cooler process, no updated BIOS flashing utilities, no overclocking safe guards and not even a CMOS button. Even though the XFX nForce 780i SLI performs well, is stable and looks good, it just simply lacks in features I'd expect an enthusiast board to have. I can't help but want to look elsewhere to the Tier One manufacturers for a quiet solution that is better kitted out."

More information can be found here.
Corsair TX750W Power Supply @ Bjorn3D
"2007 seemed to be the year of the power supply here at Bjorn3D. 2008 may end up being much the same. Today we are taking a look at the 750 watt version from the Corsair TX line of power supplies. According to Corsiar, the TX series is designed for PC enthusiasts looking for a great product at a great price. In our previous review of the 450 watt model from Corsair's VX line, we found that Corsair lived up to it's claims of a price-conscious product. Let's see if they keep with that trend with the TX750W."

More information can be found here.
Thermaltake T1000 Laptop cooler Review @ XtremeComputing
"Not only does this heat make using my laptop for long periods of time uncomfortable, it can also damage and shorten the life of computer components. So it is in my (and probably your) best interest to keep your laptop as cool as possible. Laptops don't generally have any way to control the fan speed on its cooling fan(s) so what other way of keeping the laptop cool is there? Well that is where things like Thermaltake's range of laptop coolers come in handy."

More information can be found here.
Wednesday, January 9, 2008
Scythe Andy Samurai Master Heatsink Review
"The Scythe Andy Samurai Master (SCASM-1000) heatsink may be big and voluminous, but it proves to be an effective and most importantly, quiet, heatsink to operate. The Andy Samurai Master stands 126mm tall, and the upper body a shocking 120mm square, but Scythe float much of this becometh over a relatively compact lower body (78x80mm in general shape). In other words, Scythe have built a heatsink to hover over the motherboard like a Vogon mother ship. Design wise, the Andy Samurai Master heatsink weighs in at 685grams and comes packing no less than six 6mm diameter copper heatpipes and a 120mm 1200RPM fan."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: How to write... a strategy game
"So, in this third instalment in my now re-focused and less selfish series I’m going to be looking at Real-Time Strategy games and try to see how they are written, what stories they can tell well and how they may change in the future. Helping me out along the way is Magnus Jensen, lead designer on the fantastic World in Conflict. //World in Conflict is an especially interesting game to use for a case-study since it basically re-wrote a lot of the rules for how stories are told and what stories are told in RTS games. In a time when most titles in the genre are still using talking heads or, at best, acted-out FMVs between missions, //World in Conflict used a mixture of scales to engage players. During gameplay players will be fighting in battles which determine the course of a war, but in between you’ll be embroiled in the much more claustrophobic side of the war – up close with the troops, exposed to their personal battles. What goes into an RTS game? Do well-known authors like Tom Clancy bring anything worthwhile to a developing title and can any RTS game win our hearts without Joe Kucan? Enough with the questions! It’s time for answers!"

More information can be found here.
iPod Touch 16 GB @ Bjorn3D
"Apple long has had the MP3-market in its firm hands. Ever since the first iPod was released they somehow have managed to win the hearts of millions of customers even if their players never have been at the technological forefront."

More information can be found here.
Thermaltake SwordM Full Tower Case Review @ Tweaknews.net
"Overall, the SwordM is an exciting case to work with. The thick aluminum construction is expertly manufactured and aggressive styling throughout give it a look all its own. The hydraulic-powered top and side panels will surely turn heads, even if their usefulness may be questionable. This chassis comes equipped with just about every feature imaginable and then some, so it can easily be a case that lasts through several more system builds."

More information can be found here.
NZXT Rogue Crafted Series SFF Gaming Case @ Benchmark Reviews
"As an Enthusiast I have always considered many Small Form Factor cases to host my gaming rig, and I can comfortably state that a large number of members of gaming community consider SFF cases as well, but in my case full or mid tower cases have always been my choice due to higher cooling potential and better airflow they have been known to offer. Today at Benchmark Reviews we have the new NZXT Rouge Crafted Series SFF gaming chassis which focuses on key-points such as higher cooling potential, supporting bigger power supplies and most importantly hosting the highest end gaming cards with no size restrictions. Please join us as we explore NZXT's newest addition to SFF gaming cases."

More information can be found here.
Tuesday, January 8, 2008
SplashTop Running On Prototype ASUS Notebook
"DeviceVM's SplashTop, a product we had named as one of the greatest Linux innovations in 2007, is sharing a booth this week at the Consumer Electronic Show (CES) with ASUS. At their booth we were allowed to check out a SplashTop demo running on an ASUS notebook! This notebook has yet to be introduced by ASUS, but it's intended for high-end gaming and comes with SplashTop Linux as a complementary operating system. This version of SplashTop is slightly updated and has new features too."

More information can be found here.
Auras LPT-709 Wave Heatsink Review
"Looking for a light weight heatsink that's compatible with both AMD and Intel processor platforms? The Auras LPT-709 heatsink is one such cooler, and it runs fairly quietly too. The LPT-709 comes with a 92mm PWM fan that scales in speed from 800-2400RPM with compatible motherboards. At its fastest speed the fan is moderately audible. Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) compatible fans are noted by their 4-pin power connectors, and what PWM does is enable the BIOS to directly control fan speed so the PC keeps itself cool under load, yet decreases fan noise when it isn't. "

More information can be found here.
Thermaltake Armor+ @ Bjorn3D
"The heading sounds more like military news bulletin doesn't it? Although it's not, it means the same just different context. When it comes to upgrading your PC case, there are lots and lots of options. Hundreds of companies fighting for your money trying to outrun each other with fancy designs, abnormal and extreme solutions. Thermaltake is a company where anything is possible with the right personnel. Whether it's a new case or simple upgrade, Thermaltake comes to a rescue with dozens of enclosures to pick from."

More information can be found here.
SteelSeries Siberia Neckband Gaming Headset Review @ Tweaknews.net
"With sound quality almost as good as professional studio headsets you really can't go wrong with the Siberia Neckband Headset. If you have a big head like me and comfort is a concern for you however, I would suggest you look for a more conventional headset design."

More information can be found here.
Maxtor OneTouch 4 Plus 500GB Review @ Digital Trends
"Maxtor's latest OneTouch drive (4 Plus) has a monolithic look, and lots of features. It also has some shortcomings."

More information can be found here.
Unleash the Fury @ TechDomain
"There has been a lot of bad press about the Australian developed online PvP game, Fury, by Auran studios. The unfortunate thing is that most of these reviewers appeared to miss the point of what the game is all about. A brief look on the offical Fury forums is all it takes to realise that the Fury community at large is clearly unhappy with this situation. So, what can we, at TechDomain, do to help? The answer was to write a fair review that accurately reflects the state of the game. We'll be taking a interesting approach to our analysis of this unique title. We thought we would try something different - we invited the Fury community at large to contribute to our latest review, a game which I've come to love as a challenging competitive PvP game in a genre of its own. Ultimately, we asked them to Unleash the Fury. "Has Auran opened a dating site? No, Fury's match maker is there to match you with players of similar skill to make the arenas both enjoyable and challenging."

More information can be found here.
Monday, January 7, 2008
Apack Zerotherm Nirvana 120 Heatsink Review
"The Zerotherm Nirvana 120 heatsink is compatible with socket 775 Intel Core 2 Duo/Quad/Extreme and socket 754/939/940/AM2/AM2+ AMD Athlon64 processors. It ships with a manual fan speed controller that can bring sound levels down to whisper quiet, though we'd prefer to leave that aside and let the Nirvana 120 work at its best. You'll see exactly what we mean by that a little later in this review. A 120mm fan is set within the body of the heatsink, and it spins at a speed of 700-2600RPM (as manually controlled). A pair of blue LEDs illuminate the translucent impeller blades."

More information can be found here.
Gigabyte GA-P31-DS3L @ Bjorn3D
"To shed some light on a confusing situation Gigabyte has sent us one of their P31 motherboards for review. P31 hardware is targeted directly for the budget consumer and accordingly can be found for just under $80 in several flavors from various motherboard makers. Intel is not known for cheaply pricing their venerable chipsets, so P31 is unique in that it is a hybrid of the much acclaimed P35 and old stalwart 975X chipsets. For the technically inclined the P31 chipset is composed of the P35 northbridge MCH chip with the 975X’s ICH7 southbridge chip for an interesting combination of old and new. For reference 965 chipsets used ICH8 and P35 uses the ICH9 series of southbridge chips."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Asus EAH3870 TOP
"This is the closest that an AMD/ATI-based graphics card has got to competing with Nvidia at the same price point for some time now, but there are still cases where even this factory overclocked Radeon HD 3870 from Asus disappoints me a bit. It pains me to say that because the Radeon HD 3870 is a truly fantastic product that we are big fans of at bit-tech. The penalty for enabling anti-aliasing is the single most disappointing downside and in particular I'm referring to 4xAA performance compared to what else is on the market at the same price. We're now in 2008 and one would hope that a performance mainstream graphics card is able to cope with 4xAA enabled at respectable settings and resolutions in most games. Of course, / /Crysis is an exception to this rule (and probably will be for some time to come), but there are still times where the performance drop is much larger than what we're used to seeing on ATI-based graphics cards of days gone by. On the whole though, the card looks to be a great choice as long as Asus meets its suggested retail price and that you also know about the sometimes extreme AA performance penalty. However, our suggestion would be to look at one of the cheaper Radeon HD 3870s on the market, pocket the difference and then dabble in a bit of overclocking. We say this because although the Asus EAH3870 TOP gets close to a similarly priced GeForce 8800 GT, it never really matches it in every scenario."

More information can be found here.
OCZ Technology ATV Turbo USB 2 flash drive Review @ XtremeComputing
"Today OCZ have given us the chance of taking a look at one of there latest Flash drives on the market and that is the ATV Turbo. Available in a number of sizes, ranging from 2GB to 8GB, right though to an amazing 16GB version an probably a 32gb version on the way. Thus giving the consumer more space then ever to store files. And that’s all, the ATV Turbo flash drives main feature is there durable and rubber case housing which OCZ claim to be 100% waterproof and shock proof, so this should be interesting to see how it performs. Today I got my hands on the ATV Turbo 4GB version."

More information can be found here.
Thermaltake Bigwater 760i Liquid Cooling System Review @ Tweaknews.net
"This system is a bit different from other liquid coolers I've reviewed - rather than mounting it outside the case or on the side panel, this system is uses up two of 5 ¼ drive bays, keeping it out of the way of other components. Let's see how this setup works and more importantly, how it performs."

More information can be found here.
Sunday, January 6, 2008
CES 2008: Day 0 Preview
"While the International Consumer Electronic Show (CES) doesn't officially get underway until tomorrow, this afternoon we have some pictures of the setup process that goes on each year to prepare the show floors at the different exhibit halls for the over 100,000+ visitors that have swarmed to Las Vegas. Here are today's pictures, prior to being threatened by a Microsoft security agent. As you can see, the workers are still very much preparing the hundreds of booths that will be on display."

More information can be found here.
Minority Report Computing - A Stones throw away? @ XtremeComputing
"Well were do we begin, you probably are reading this article thinking I am either totally mad or have completely lost the plot, but I have not and I intend to show you why. I was inspired when I saw Tom Cruise in the film Minority Report, using his hands in thin air to control on screen information and move and pull objects. It is been quite a while since that film and slowly the technology to make this happen is not far off, by this I mean we could end up seeing this in action by the end of 2008,"

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: SteelSeries Ikari mouse and SP mousemat
"The Ikari is one of the best mice I've ever had a chance to look at – and because drinking tea at your desk is a constant hazard for me, I've looked at more than my fair share of mice. It ranks up there with the Logitech G5 and the Razer DeathAdder. It has two problems though – specifically and only two. First, the enforced ergonomics on it mean that it won't be suitable for all hands and grip types, so you'll definitely want to go hands-on with a demo model before you buy it. Secondly, the two thumb buttons are a tad too small for my taste. Occasionally your thumb will have to search for the right place to push. Despite that though, the Ikari is still easy to wield and will suit most gamers down to a tee without forcing you to pay through the nose for features you'll never use. If you're / /really bothered by how heavy your mouse is then you may want to look elsewhere, but if you're man enough to admit that you don't really mind then the Ikari is the mouse for you."

More information can be found here.
Corsair, Kingston, OCZ, Super Talent DDR3 1800MHz Memory Kits @ Legit Reviews
"When it comes to DDR3 a 2GB kit will set you back anywhere from $199 for a 1333MHz kit to over $500 for an 1800MHz kit. Obviously, DDR3 memory is still for early adapters and enthusiasts, but prices are expected to drop significantly as the year goes on. Intel is getting ready to release more chipsets that support DDR3 memory with the Intel X48 Express chipset and NVIDIA is rumored to support DDR3 for the first time with their nForce 790i SLI chipsets. With both of these chipsets soon becoming the main component of their flagship performance platforms, it will lead to improved DDR3 memory sales. So, before those chipsets come out Legit Reviews gathered together four 1800MHz DDR3 memory kits from the leading memory companies here in North America. Corsair, Kingston, OCZ and Super Talent are familiar names here on Legit Reviews for good reason - they all make great enthusiast memory..."

More information can be found here.
Saturday, January 5, 2008
Advice: Don't Switch to OS X @ CoolTechZone.com
"Almost everyone that knows me can tell you that ever since I switched to OS X about five years ago, I?ve been a nonstop evangelist for Apple. I?m totally impressed with their products and their operating system, and I love helping others understand why they should be interested in these alternatives to Windows. I can usually figure out a way to help someone justify that a switch to OS X would be a good thing for them personally, but I was recently asked for some advice and gave an answer that surprised even me."

More information can be found here.
Microsoft's Secret Love for Mac Users @ CoolTechZone.com
"One of the things that I dislike about software is upgrading it. Don?t get me wrong, I love a new version of a good application just as much as any other computer user, but there can be times when compatibility and the actual usefulness of some of the newer features may hinder you from upgrading right away. In addition to those concerns, many software upgrades can be quite pricey, and if what you?re using is working just fine, you may be hesitant to pay to play, so to speak. The worst thing is when you purchase software and then the company issues a newer version only a month or two after you purchased your version. It?s a vicious cycle, but you have to love it."

More information can be found here.
One Reason Why Leopard Trumps Windows @ CoolTechZone.com
"While I?ve been testing Leopard, it?s been made clear to me even more so than before that there is a lot to love about OS X. Those of us who use it to have our favorite features of functionality and design, and as a former 24/7 Windows user, I just don?t understand how someone could compare Windows and OS X and pick Windows anymore. For me, the game is over, and Apple has won."

More information can be found here.
AMD Phenom 9500 Linux Performance
"Have you recently upgraded to AMD's Spider platform with their quad-core Phenom processor and are running Linux? If so, and are experiencing kernel panics, stability problems, and even a psychedelic Ubuntu logo, you're not alone. Earlier this week we had looked at AMD's new 790FX Chipset under Linux and now it's time to deliver the world's first Linux benchmarks of AMD's Spider platform. However, getting to the point of delivering these Linux benchmarks wasn't exactly smooth sailing. In this article, we'll be looking at the AMD Phenom 9500 performance under Ubuntu 7.10 as well as sharing our experiences with this new AMD platform."

More information can be found here.
Firefox 3: Why Bother to Upgrade? @ OSWeekly.com
"I have been a Firefox user since it was considered Firebird. Yes, I despised using Internet Explorer that much. But despite Firebird eventually maturing into Firefox that we all know today, I can't believe that I have yet to find any indication that the Mozilla team is planning on improving the really lame handling of RSS feeds. Again, Flock is providing users with so much more and despite this, Firefox continues to remain with most of the same features it always has - why? I know. It's Google."

More information can be found here.
Microsoft: So Large to Ignore Management Mishaps @ OSWeekly.com
"It's hard to catch decent news in Redmond these days. And with the news of the freshly departed Microsoft CIO, one has to wonder who is next in line to replace him? Yet the question remains - what was the actual event that got him fired? One unconfirmed source indicates that it was inappropriate behavior directed at other members of the staff, while another source indicates something was in conflict with his handling of company secrets."

More information can be found here.
Why Users Wait for OS Upgrades @ OSWeekly.com
"Although I didn’t purchase it during its opening weekend, I did get my copy of Leopard soon after it hit store shelves. What can I say, I like being an early adopter even though I do know that there can be a price to pay. It’s fun to have the latest and greatest operating system, but that fun can sometimes be infringed upon by early showstopper problems that go undetected until the general public installs the OS on their computers. Once they get a hold of it, any number of issues can crop up due to different configurations, usage patterns, or just genuine flaws in the software."

More information can be found here.
Friday, January 4, 2008
Zalman CNPS9700NT Heatsink Review
"The Zalman CNPS9700NT follows in the footsteps of the popular CNPS9700 LED heatsink, and it's just as big as the latter. What sets the CNPS9700NT apart is a 100mm Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) compliant fan - making this heatsink a more attractive choice for Intel platforms than the pervious version and its manual fan speed controller. Oh, and did we mention it's chrome plated an evil Terminator-grey shade of silver? Blame nVidia for that one, personally we prefer our heatsinks in bare aluminum or copper."

More information can be found here.
AMD Releases Additional R600 GPU Programming Documentation (Exclusive)
"In the second NDA-free documentation dump, AMD has just released programming data on the M76 and RS690 graphics processors. While the RadeonHD developers have already had these documents, this information will help the free software community in understanding the internal workings of AMD's graphics processors. In this article, we have information on this just-released data as well as what else the community can expect in the way of documentation in the near future."

More information can be found here.
Nox Pulsar 750 W Power Supply Review
"Nox makes continuous efforts to provide premium-class computers with as much power as possible with high standards of quality and affordable prices."

More information can be found here.
Xilence RAM HP Cooler Review
"Cooling of such components as RAM memories is more than advisable; it is almost compulsory. It guarantees more stability and a longer life."

More information can be found here.
Turbo Charge TB550 Portable Cell Phone Charger Review @ Bigbruin.com
"The Turbo Charge TB550 Portable Cell Phone Charger is a gadget designed to make sure your mobile phone always has enough power. Whether you can't reach the wall charger, can't find the car charger, or are lost in the middle of nowhere in desperate need of help, this device will take the power from two AA batteries and provide several full charges for a large selection of today's popular phones."

More information can be found here.
VisionTek TV Wonder 650PCIe @ Bjorn3D
"The core of any TV tuner is the chip that is designed to receive the signal. Currently, there are various chips that are designed to receive different signals. If you have purchased a TV tuner two years ago, you are most likely to have a card that only receives analog signal. Lately, the newer tuner card comes with digital tuner receivers which receives DVB or ATSC transmissions. Many newer and more expensive tuners even come with both tuners (combo) where users are able to receive both signals. A combo tuner is different from hybrid tuner. A combo tuner can receive both digital and analog together to allow users to watch TV coming from both signals while a hybrid tuner can only receive one or the other."

More information can be found here.
Silverstone MS05 - 2.5 docking station Review @ XtremeComputing
"For this review I will be looking at a product from the highly respected pc hardware manufacturer SilverStone. The product up for review is in fact a hard drive caddy / enclosure, not a typical 3½” caddy this is a sleek caddy for a 2½” drive and as a bonus it comes with a docking station, it is the MS05 from SilverStone. All will be revealed in the review."

More information can be found here.
Thursday, January 3, 2008
Creative ZEN Vision:M Media Player @ TechDomain
"These days, those who don't own an MP3 player are somewhat becoming the minority. Boasting more accessories than an R&B artist, MP3 players are becoming quite a fashion statement. We require these portable jukeboxes to be stylish, light weight, and attrictive, whilst giving us the envy of all our friends. When most people think MP3 players, they think iSomethings... Thats a bit to obvious, lets try *Pods. Whilst the *Pod might have the majority of the market share, there are other players on the market, such as iRiver, Samsung or Creative. Heir in lies the question; are the compeditors offerings are as good if not better than the market leader?"

More information can be found here.
Sunon Waturbo Liquid Circulation Heatsink Review
"The Sunon Waturbo isn't your average heatsink, at its center is a liquid core and a little magnetically coupled impeller to stir things up. As the 92mm fan spins, so do the blades of the internal impeller. This pumps the red glycol based coolant around the small aluminum chamber at the heart of the Waturbo, through a pyramid of 1mm square copper pins and around again. The idea is to use the liquid to distribute the heat from the hefty copper base to the rest of the aluminum heatsink. In practice, the concept more or less works."

More information can be found here.
I4U: Razer Mako 2.1 Advanced Desktop Audio Gaming Speakers Review
"The Razer Mako speakers fire equally in all directions. This allows you to be able to enjoy the same rich sound quality in any position of the room. You can tell readily if you use your computer for watching movies with more than one person in the room. Everyone gets the same sound quality."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: A DRMerry New Year
"Wow, we made it. It's been another wild year full of technology battles, format wars, and even some good old go-for-the-throat company fights. And yet, the world goes on, the beat of technology thumping at its usual pace. Intel and AMD, Nvidia and ATI/AMD, Blu-ray and HD-DVD. With the holiday seasons over and no major operating system release on the immediate horizon, the companies can go lick their wounds and ready their teams for 2008. Minus a few dollars or people that traded hands, they will be relatively unchanged - the new year will be as the last, with a couple big launches, some good ideas and bad ones, and a bunch of marketing BS and drivel for our entertainment. But one thing HAS changed - one war has actually seen lines move, ground shift. It is a war where each skirmish is close to all of our hearts, and we're on the losing side. It's the RIAA vs. the People - and, for 2007 at least, I think we came out behind."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Shuttle SN68PTG5 XPC
"It absolutely does not matter about the system’s shortcomings because it does what it's designed to do, excellently, on the condition that you use the right hardware inside. Plan it out like I did above and you can get yourself a very inexpensive, yet very capable media centre that sits in a tiny footprint. Even if you don't want an HTPC, it can be used as a general productivity box for the family—video, audio, web, documents etc—and you'd be hard pressed finding something so inexpensive but upgradable. The Shuttle SN68PTG5 sits at an almost perfect price to feature ratio and as a result, I would absolutely recommend it to anyone looking to build a Home Theatre PC."

More information can be found here.
Wednesday, January 2, 2008
Alienware Area-51 m9750 Review @ Digital Trends
"With its dual GeForce Go 7950 GTX videocards in SLI and Core 2 Duo processor, this is one blazing-fast notebook."

More information can be found here.
Hellgate: London PC Game Review @ TechDomain
"Hellgate: London was released in Australia on the 31st of October, 2007. I was interested in this game as I had read that the developers had previously worked on titles such as Diablo 2. Expecting something similar to Diablo, I was a little surprised to find that the game was more of a dungeon hack & slash with only a small amount of outdoor areas. It is still however more of a RPG than an action game."

More information can be found here.
Glacialtech Igloo 5750 Silent Heatsink Review
"In this review Frostytech is evaluating the new Glacialtech Igloo 5750 Silent heatsink, a quiet little cooler with double fans and a single power cord for your convenience. This cooler is compatible with socket 775 Intel processors and the full range of AMD K8 CPU's. Made by Taiwanese heatsink manufacturer Glacialtech, the Igloo 5750 Silent is first and foremost a low noise heatsink - so don't let its dual 92mm fans fool you into thinking otherwise."

More information can be found here.
Gigabyte Volar GH-PSV21-FB Heatsink Review
"The Gigabyte Volar heatsink looks cool because it looks different. Perched at an angle above the processor, the Volar's 120mm diameter smokey grey fan has rather large impeller blades that look as if they'll propel air into the cooling fins of its donut shape heatsink with quiet force."

More information can be found here.
Kingston 8GB Ultimate 266x CompactFlash Card @ Legit Reviews
"The Kingston 8GB Ultimate 266X CompactFlash card offers an amazing minimum sustained write speed rating of 266X, making it one of the fastest cards to support high-end digital cameras and devices. With transfer rates of 45MB/sec. read and 40MB/sec. write, you can capture more continuous, high resolution images in less time with the CompactFlash Ultimate than traditional CompactFlash memory cards..."

More information can be found here.
AMD Phenom 9600: Black Edition @ Bjorn3D
"Today, we at Bjorn3D have the pleasure of reviewing the first of the Phenom family of processors to be released for sale to the public sector, the Phenom 9600. This processor will be sold in two versions; the Standard Edition with a multiplier locked above its 11.5X standard and the Black Edition which has a completely unlocked multiplier. Our review will be conducted using the Black Edition and for added flavor we'll include benchmarks and statistics from the Phenom 9900 engineering sample AMD was kind enough to include."

More information can be found here.
Western Digital 320GB Scorpio 2.5 Inch SATA 3Gbps Hard Drive Review @ Bigbruin.com
"The 250GB version of the Western Digital Scorpio 2.5 inch SATA hard drive was reviewed at Bigbruin.com in September 2007, and it made a very positive impression. With an even higher capacity and faster transfer rates, it seems that the newer 320GB version would be destined for even greater accolades."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Adding more storage to your Asus Eee PC
"A way of imagining this is with two sheets of transparent overhead projector paper -- the bottom sheet is your read only partition, while the top sheet is your user partition. Using your marker pen, you write something on the top sheet, while everything that is written on the sheet underneath is still visible through it -- giving the effect of a single sheet. Simply replacing the top sheet with a fresh one is all that is needed to bring you back to the beginning. The downside to this method, apart from a slight overhead, is that performing large updates (such as updating OpenOffice) will take up a large amount of space. Replacing 300MB with 300MB of updated files means eating an additional 300MB out of your user space, rather than replacing the originals. Aside from the fast recovery, another upside to this method is backups. Instead of backing up the entire 4GB of hard drive space, we only need to backup the secondary partition as this contains all the changes. For most people these are little things like preferences, favourites and a few documents. In size, this takes up very little space -- but tweaking things to how you want them takes a while, so it's worth backing up. In my case, on a pretty highly modified install, my secondary partition is still under 500MB which, even by today's standards, is still small. In this article, we'll be modifying our Eee PC by neatly adding in an extra 32GB of storage space -- this is well within the grasp of anyone with even the most basic soldering skills. In part two of this series, we'll be making the most out of the operating system, including how to successfully back up quickly."

More information can be found here.
bit-tech News: Games to Watch in 2008
"Last year was awesome, wasn’t it? We had some of the best games of recent times dropped into our laps and, at the same time, our friends and families discovered that computer games could be fun too. Suddenly there were new people to play games with and brand new crappy cash-ins to play. Casual gaming has started taking off in a big way. At the same time though, hardcore gaming has seen a massive boost too. New franchises have been introduced, like //Mass Effect and //Assassin’s Creed, while existing series’ have expanded, swelled and grown to include yet more titles; //The Orange Box, //Unreal Tournament 3, //Call of Duty 4 – all of which were among our best games of 2007. Now that the Year of The Game is over though, a bleak, uncertain future seems to await us – or does it? What games shine out as bright, bountiful gems in the dark Wii-dominated future of gaming? Will we see yet more new franchises being launched? Can we hope for more indie-inspired and genre-pushing games as //Portal and //BioShock, or is 2008 the Year of The Movie Tie-In?"

More information can be found here.
Antec P190 + 1200 Case and PSU package Review @ XtremeComputing
"Today I shall be looking at a product from one of the better- known manufacturers of pc equipment. The manufacturer is Antec and the product in question is the Antec P190 + 1200. That, for those of you who didn’t realise, is a case with 1200watts of psu included, that’s not a typo it has 2 psu’s included a 550watt and a 650watt."

More information can be found here.
Tuesday, January 1, 2008
Microsoft Wireless Notebook Presenter Mouse 8000 Review @ Digital Trends
"The Microsoft Wireless Notebook Presenter Mouse 8000 looks like a mouse but functions as a hand-held presenter."

More information can be found here.
Review: OCZ ATV 4GB memory stick
"OCZ Technology sent over their 4GB ATV memory stick to test out and abuse. Since this memory stick is ruggedized and water-proof, I'll try to put it through some stress tests. Unlike last time, I won't get the chance to have the kids put it in the fish tank as we no longer have fish. However, I do have about 8"

More information can be found here.
DXG USA DXG-110 10MP Camera
"Normally at Phoronix we don't look at any digital photography products, but the DXG-110 from DXG USA had caught our attention as being the first 10 megapixel digital camera available for under $200 USD (it retails for $170 to be exact). Higher megapixel cameras are often misinterpreted by consumers as meaning a higher quality product, while that is not always the case and with the DXG-110 you shouldn't set out looking to take professional-grade photographs. In this article we are also looking at some of the photo management programs available to Linux users."

More information can be found here.
I4U: PNY XLR8 8800 GTS 512MB Graphics Card Review
"I was surprised by the performance of the stock clocked PNY XLR8 8800 GTS 512MB. It was very close to the performance of the overclocked XFX 8800 GTS 512MB XXX card I reviewed previously. The MSRP of the PNY XLR8 8800 GTS 512MB is $369.99 from PNY."

More information can be found here.
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